Seeking Hebrew names for Victor Maxwell #general


Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

It would be a mistake to assume that any Hebrew name matches
any particular secular (English, German, etc.) name. For
example, my grandfather and my wife's grandfather were both
called "Leon", but one was "Laib" in Yiddish and the other
was "Lazar." I had a high school classmate whose Hebrew name
was Mordechai and whose English name was Gary. One can simply
never guess at these things.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland


Judith Romney Wegner
 


It would be a mistake to assume that any Hebrew name matches
any particular secular (English, German, etc.) name. For
example, my grandfather and my wife's grandfather were both
called "Leon", but one was "Laib" in Yiddish and the other
was "Lazar." I had a high school classmate whose Hebrew name
was Mordechai and whose English name was Gary. One can simply
never guess at these things.
Actually, Shlomo, that's not so! There are a great many genuine
correspondences. so it is quite realistic to make an informed guess.
True, people don't always use the truly corresponding name
nowadays; they more often settle fora non-corresponding soundalike
and sometimes not even that. But that is due in large part to the
ignorance of contemporary Jews when it comes to classical Hebrew and
Yiddish and does not mean that no genuine correspondences exist --
so it's often worth taking a stab at it. For instance, ! have yet
to meet any Jewish boy named William whose Hebrew name is not Ze'ev.
That's because Ze'ev means wolf, and the switch >from Yiddish Wolf to
English William seems to have becomeabsolutely standard. You can more
or less bank on that one!

In fact, you yourself gave us examples of one true correspondence and
one non-correspoondence. Leon and Leib represent a genuine
correspondence, because both names mean "lion." But Leon and
Lazar do not correspond in any way, because Lazar is simply
corruption of the biblical name El'azar, which has nothing whatever
to do with lions.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


David Kravitz
 

My Jewish names are Fischel (Yiddish) and Eliezer. Make what you will of
that.

I will shortly be making aliyah and my new address will be Netanya, Israel.

David Kravitz
Bournemouth, England


Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <uViCr8LlbtmJ-pn2-XgzWybWcQe52@poblano>,
Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@hashkedim.com> wrote:
On Tue, 17 Aug 2004 04:13:21 UTC, israel@math.ubc.ca (Robert Israel) opined:
X-No-archive: yes
<MBernet@aol.com> wrote:
Occasionally, according to Beider,
Avigdor was a kinnuy for Moshe (Moses).
I don't know if Beider mentions the reason for this kinnuy:
according to the Bible, the original Moshe was given that name by
Pharaoh's daughter. But logically his parents must have already given
him a name, which the Bible neglects to mention. According to midrash,
he had seven (or in other versions 10) such names, and one of them
was Avigdor. See e.g.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=830&letter=M
Where do you find any of this, in the Bible or in the Encyclopedia? The
explanation you give, if true, is certainly not off-topic, for it would bear
on name tracing in recent generations, for example. But I don't see it in
either Breshit or the article to which you refer. It would be well, when
basing an argument on "the Bible" to give a reference to chapter and verse,
so that other users can verify it and make use of the information. I, for
one, would be very interested in knowing the basis for a connection between
"Moshe" and "Avigdor".
In that Jewish Encyclopedia article I referred to, see the paragraph
entitled "His Bringing up."

If you meant actually to refer to midrashim, it is hard to take them
seriously as unsupported statements of what name or names Moshe was called
by. One has to distinguish between exegetic Talmudic explanations and
Biblical ones coming out of an attempt to record "history" as it was
perceived in pre-dispersion Israel.
I am not claiming that the midrashim should be taken as literally true.
It wouldn't bother me even if you don't want to believe that Moshe existed
at all. All I'm saying is that when people (not in biblical times, but
perhaps a few hundred years ago) used Avigdor as a kinnuy for Moshe, these
midrashim are the source for that connection.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/18/2004 9:01:39 PM Eastern Standard Time,
david_kravitz@hotmail.com writes:
My Jewish names are Fischel (Yiddish) and Eliezer. Make what you will of
that.

==Eliezer is an early Biblical name; he was senior administrative assistant
to the patriarch Abraham and was sent by him to Haran to find a bride (Rebecca)
for his son, Isaac.

==Fischel, according to Beider, is a kinnuy for Ephraim. Others, including
Kaganoff say it is derived >from Haim (life) via old French Vives, which became
variously Vischel, Feivel, Fayvush and Phoebus. Kaganoff thinks it may also be
derived >from a house sign depicting a fish.

Michael Bernet, New York