WWI Alien Registration: Russian immigrants #general


scperkins <SPerkins@...>
 

Hello:

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society. Under Russian law you were
elligible for Russian military service if a grandparent had been a Russian
citizen. This was the same rule for eligibility to vote in some recent
Russian elections. Not sure if it is still the law.

Regards,

Steven C. Perkins


Tom Chatt
 

Steven Perkins wrote:

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society. Under Russian law you were
elligible for Russian military service if a grandparent had been a Russian
citizen.
Hmmm. Being that many emigrants >from Russia left for the purpose of evading
military service, I wonder how many of them would have registered with the
Russian consulate in the new world even if "required". It seems Russia would
have little practical power to enforce this requirement. Is there any
indication what percentage of immigrants complied with this?

I am familiar, by the way, with the American Historical Society of Germans
from Russia (www.ahsgr.org), and they have done some excellent work.
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: scperkins [mailto:SPerkins@...]
Sent: Monday, September 06, 2004 10:53 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: WWI Alien Registration: Russian immigrants

Hello:

This was the same rule for eligibility to vote in some recent
Russian elections. Not sure if it is still the law.

Regards,

Steven C. Perkins


Alan <aNOhsSPAMsha@...>
 

SPerkins@... (scperkins) wrote:

Hello:

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society.
I tried to find this reference on their website, http://www.ahsgr.org,
but couldn't locate it. Can you give more details?

Thanks.

--
Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
aNOhsSPAMsha@... (remove NO SPAM)

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Tom Chatt
 

Russia required all male Russian immigrants in USA and Canada to register
at a Russian Consulate during WWI. Not sure if they did the same during
the Russo-Japanese War. These can be located through the American Society
of Germans >from Russia Historical Society.

I tried to find this reference on their website, http://www.ahsgr.org,
but couldn't locate it. Can you give more details?
I too was unable to find this on the ahsgr.org website. However, I did find some
very useful information about Russian consular records here:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mafsocna/russian.htm

They don't specifically mention this military registration. The site says:
"The content of the files which have greatest value to genealogists include
nationality certificates, passport and visa applications and correspondence,
passports, correspondence on matters of inheritance, Red Cross reports on missing
persons, financial records including money transfers to relatives still in Russia,
correspondence of emigrants seeking family members still in Russia; questions of
military service; and business dealings of emigrants."

If these military registration records existed at the consulate as described, they
would be found in this resource. The website describes how the US National
Archives happened to come by the complete records of the Russian US consulates.

Cheers,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA