Topics

1950s Brooklyn, NY Phone Directory Information #general


Gay Lynne Kegan <glynne@...>
 

I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s,
which begins with the exchange "EV". If you are familiar with how to
locate an address or any other information, I would appreciate hearing >from
you.

Abe Rosenthal
Minnesota
aberosenthal7@...


Adelle <adNOstavis@...>
 

"Gay Lynne Kegan" <glynne@...> wrote

I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s,
which begins with the exchange "EV". If you are familiar with how to locate an
address or any other information, I would appreciate hearing >from you.

Abe Rosenthal
Minnesota
aberosenthal7@... ---
Sender: Gay Lynne Kegan <glynne@...>
NYC Phone numbers used to begin with words (denoting a neighborhood). EV stood for
Evergreen (#'s 3 and 8 ). My grandmother's # began the same way. She lived in
Williamsburg, Brooklyn >from the '20's all the way to her passing in '86.

Adelle Stavis


Dick Plotz
 

Adelle Stavis wrote:

NYC Phone numbers used to begin with words (denoting a neighborhood). EV stood
for Evergreen (#'s 3 and 8 ). My grandmother's # began the same way. She lived in
Williamsburg, Brooklyn >from the '20's all the way to her passing in '86.
Actually, Brooklyn was divided (at roughly the level of Prospect Park) into a
northern and a southern half, and exchanges were assigned to one half or the
other. An EVergreen number could have been anywhere in the northern half of
Brooklyn, not necessarily in Williamsburg. The prefixes didn't necessarily refer
to the half you would expect; ESplanade was a southern half exchange and was not
used in Brooklyn Heights, where the Esplanade (properly the Promenade!) is.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


backon@...
 

glynne@... (Gay Lynne Kegan) writes:

I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s,
which begins with the exchange "EV". If you are familiar with how to
locate an address or any other information, I would appreciate hearing >from you.
EV = Evergreen
I had a relative in Williamsburg Brooklyn using this exchange.

I believe the cross-directory in the Brooklyn Public Library would allow you to
locate an address >from a phone number. [This is a phone directory but numerical:
thus you'd have EV1 1111, followed by EV1 1112, etc.]

Josh Backon
backon@...


Ira Leviton
 

Dear Group,

Gay Lynne Kegan wrote, "I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for
Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s, which begins with the exchange "EV". If
you are familiar with how to locate an address...

And Josh Backon continued... "I believe the cross-directory in the
Brooklyn Public Library would allow you to locate an address >from a phone
number. [This is a phone directory but numerical: thus you'd have EV1
1111, followed by EV1 1112, etc.]"

And then Dick Plotz added, "Actually, Brooklyn was divided (at roughly
the level of Prospect Park) into a northern and a southern half, and
exchanges were assigned to one half or the other..."

For U.S. residents seeking more addresses >from old phone numbers, I
urge you to ask at your local library. Most libraries don't have old out
of town phone books, but many belong to the same interlibrary loan group,
and therefore can get them (often on microfilm) and can sometimes tell you
on the spot what's available. The usual turnaround time for obtaining the
microfilm is three or four weeks. The main branch of the New York Public
Libary has old New York phone books, and exchanges information with
libraries that lend to it. (Believe it or not, they don't have every book
in the world, and they borrow, too.) This is also useful for out of town
newspapers, too.

The type of directory for a reverse phone look-up is also called a
Coles directory. I believe they came into use at different times in
different places, and I must state that I don't know if they were in use
by 1950 or when they started.

By the 1970's at the latest, telephone exchanges certainly divided
Brooklyn into northern and southern halves, at about its geographical
midsection. The other boroughs were also divided into two or three large
areas each. However, I believe that earlier (in the 1940's), they were
limited to more circumscribed areas. For instance, SH-3 (SHeepshead-3)
was originally in the area of Sheepshead Bay, although as Dick Plotz also
stated, you can't always tell the neighborhood >from the exchange, and the
names of many had nothing to do with the neighborhood. By the 1970's,
ESplanade (a southern Brooklyn exchange) was used as far away >from the
Brooklyn esplanade as possible, all the way down to Coney Island and
Brighton Beach. Again, I must emphasize that I don't know when the change
from small to larger areas was made, or even whether it was sudden or
gradual.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.