How to get parents' birth certificate NYC? #general


Anita Springer <aspringer@...>
 

I am trying to get a copy of a 1929 birth certificate of my husband's
mother, now deceased. The New York City Dept. of Health website only has
instructions for getting your own birth certificate, or for someone else
with a letter >from the person authorizing you. Will they provide my husband
a copy of his mother's birth certificate and how do we do that?

Anita Springer, Boston


Elise
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Anita Springer [mailto:aspringer@post.harvard.edu]

I am trying to get a copy of a 1929 birth certificate of my husband's
mother, now deceased. The New York City Dept. of Health website only has
instructions for getting your own birth certificate, or for someone else
with a letter >from the person authorizing you. Will they provide my
husband a copy of his mother's birth certificate and how do we do that?
Anita,

Immediate family are usually eligible to receive copies of certificates when
the person is deceased. I requested a copy of my father's 1943 birth
certificate a few years ago and they sent me a certified copy with
"deceased" stamped at the top.

Have the request be >from your husband rather than you. Provide a copy of
his mother's death certificate in lieu of a letter of authorization. On the
order form, clearly state that she's deceased, that your husband is her son,
and that he's replacing lost family records (or similar -- just don't say
genealogy). Also be sure to include a copy of his photo ID as requested in
the instructions.

The order form is available >from the NYC Department of Health website:
http://nyc.gov/html/doh/html/vr/vrbappl.html

Good luck,

Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland

KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS, SCHENDEROWITZ, EMBER (Makow Maz./Przasnysz, Poland);
EISNER, TAUB, WAHRHAFTIG, TUNIS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER/MEHLER, TAUB (Byblo/Staryy Sambor/Nizankowice/Dobromil, Ukraine);
PALEVSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN, DAITCH, GRUSHEWSKY (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
CHESIN, EHUDIN (Mstislavl, Belarus); CHERNOCK, EPSTEIN (Novozybkov, Russia)


Seth J. Bookey <sethbook@...>
 

In <20050327173605.0959940E6@mailgw.jgen.org> elisejg@comcast.net (Elise Friedman) writes:

-----Original Message-----
From: Anita Springer [mailto:aspringer@post.harvard.edu]

I am trying to get a copy of a 1929 birth certificate of my husband's
mother, now deceased. The New York City Dept. of Health website only has
instructions for getting your own birth certificate, or for someone else
with a letter >from the person authorizing you. Will they provide my
husband a copy of his mother's birth certificate and how do we do that?
Anita,
Immediate family are usually eligible to receive copies of certificates when
the person is deceased. I requested a copy of my father's 1943 birth
certificate a few years ago and they sent me a certified copy with
"deceased" stamped at the top.
Have the request be >from your husband rather than you. Provide a copy of
his mother's death certificate in lieu of a letter of authorization. On the
order form, clearly state that she's deceased, that your husband is her son,
and that he's replacing lost family records (or similar -- just don't say
genealogy). Also be sure to include a copy of his photo ID as requested in
the instructions.
The order form is available >from the NYC Department of Health website:
http://nyc.gov/html/doh/html/vr/vrbappl.html
Good luck,
Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland
All records before 1949 are available for free in a room full of microfilm
reels in the Surrogate Court Bldg across >from the Municipal Bldg. You can
get marriage, death, and birth certificates there for $5 per copy; copying
the info or taking photos is free, I suppose. I only wrote down
information, but if you're using your own camera, I doubt they would stop
you.

For post 1948 info, I went two blocks north to the Dept. of Health and
paid $15 for my great-grandmother's death certificate. No one asked me for
any proof of relationship. I simply wrote my relationship toher on the
request form. They sent it to me soon thereafter.

1948 is a year I remember as being a cut off, but not for all types of
certificates. The year that the free access cuts off is slightly different
for each type (birth, death, marriage).

--Seth

Seth J. Bookey
New York City
sethbook@panix.com