Slovakian Jewry - emigration patterns? #general


AK <alan.kolnik@...>
 

It appears that it is possible that my family, or at least my family name,
originated in Slovakia, in an area about 50 miles NE of Bratislava, and
about the same distance NW of Nitra, in a village called Hrachoviste (today,
pop. about 660, I believe). There are many people living there and from
there in the US with the last name "KOLNIK", who are NOT Jewish. However,
as far as we know, the Jewish family with our last name is only found in the
Pinsk-Minsk area (Luninetz and Kozhanhorodok, specifically, in what was
Poland to WWII and Belarus today), and Horodenka (which at one point, like
Slovakia, was part of the Austor Hungarian Empire). We have discovered a
record of a Kolnik in Hrachoviste as far back as 1702. JewishGEn also shows
researchers investigating their roots in villages close by, like Krajne.

Has anyone traced possible emigration patterns of jews out of Slovakia -
where did they go, and when, if at all?

Rgds

Alan Kolnik

Remove add-an-n-before-the-dot- and add an "n" after "verizo" to the
address below:

alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net


Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

While this is a reasonable premise to investigate, I think the simpler
possibility should not be overlooked. That is the possibility that the name
was derived independently in the two locations.

I have a similar situation with the surname ZAVODNIK. There are Zavodniks
in the US who trace to immigrants who went to Minnesota and Cleveland, Ohio
and who were Christians >from Slovenia (Austrian Empire). There are other
Zavodniks in the US (and in France) who are Jewish or know they are
descended >from Jews, and who trace back to locations in what is now Belarus
(Russian Empire). It seems most likely to me that the Jewish Zavodniks
developed the surname quite independently >from the Christians.

Remember, the suffix "NIK" is a common Slavic suffix indicating a person.
That leaves the root, 'zavod' in my case or 'kol' in Alan's case. 'Zavod'
may be a reference to a worker (factory rather than farm). My language
skills are not good enough to speculate on how 'kol' might work in such a
case, but that is an alternative worth remembering, in my opinion.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"AK" <alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net> wrote in message
news:iMYce.14876$lZ.12964@trnddc04...
It appears that it is possible that my family, or at least my family name,
originated in Slovakia, in an area about 50 miles NE of Bratislava, and
about the same distance NW of Nitra, in a village called Hrachoviste
(today,
pop. about 660, I believe). There are many people living there and from
there in the US with the last name "KOLNIK", who are NOT Jewish. However,
as far as we know, the Jewish family with our last name is only found in
the
Pinsk-Minsk area (Luninetz and Kozhanhorodok, specifically, in what was
Poland to WWII and Belarus today), and Horodenka (which at one point, like
Slovakia, was part of the Austor Hungarian Empire). We have discovered a
record of a Kolnik in Hrachoviste as far back as 1702. JewishGEn also
shows
researchers investigating their roots in villages close by, like Krajne.

Has anyone traced possible emigration patterns of jews out of Slovakia -
where did they go, and when, if at all?


anitac47@...
 

Further to Peter's reply with regard to Zavod and Kol...

My NADWORNY name is beyond uncommon among Jews. My family came >from
Odessa. All the non-Jews with the name come >from Poland or northern
Ukraine as do the very few other Jewish families with the name
(it's an occupational title meaning someone who worked on or managed
an estate).

I have always reasoned that the family started off in Poland and
emigrated to Odessa. But then again as Jews commonly were hired to
manage Polish nobles' estates my family could be independent of others
Jewish families with the name. I think you have to follow all
possibilities. The name also refers to "court" like court chancellor
in Russia. But often online presence of the name is on Polish sites
discussing fantasy sci-fi books!

And family mythology (stories everyone insists are true but no one
can prove)can send you off on wild goose chases.My relatives didn't
know about non-Jewish NADWORNYs back in the day--and somehow the story
got to circulating in my family that my gf had been a philanderer
and had children with a Catholic woman but left her and so there was
a Catholic branch of the family!! Not true but we all believed it
(I actually met a member of that Catholic family who had converted
to Judaism! Life is interesting).

Regards,
Anita Citron
Hicksville, NY


AK <alan.kolnik@...>
 

Thanks to the many people who gave me leads on this.
For those struggling with the same matter, take a look at this map
(it is found in several other places on the web as well):

http://www.chalem.com/genealogy/maps/migration.htm

- it indicates that Jews migrated to the north east out of "Hungary" and
"Austria" in the 1300's and 14-00's, so could easily have continued
later - say in the 1600's and 1700's, landing up in "poland"

Rgds
Alan Kolnik
Remove add-an-n-before-the-dot- and add an "n" after "verizo" to the
address below:
alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net


AK <alan.kolnik@...>
 

Anita:

As I worked through this matter, I found a number of maps showing Jewish
emigration patterns which you might like to look at to see if any match the
patterns that you thiunk mught fit your family's origins.

One good place to start looking at maps is:

http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/0415236614/resources/indi.asp

Also take a look at this map (it is
found in several other places on the web as well):

http://www.chalem.com/genealogy/maps/migration.htm

- it indicates that Jews migrated to the north east out of "Hungary" and
"Austria" in the 1300's and 14-00's, so could easily have continued later -
say in the 1600's and 1700's, landing up in "poland"

There are rich textual sources such as:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bukowinabook/Bukowina.html (you need to be
logged in to Jewish Gen to get to this)

http://members.shaw.ca/czernowitz/

http://www.khazaria.com/ and the sections thereunder:

Are Russian Jews Descended >from the Khazars?
Are Russian Jews Descended >from the German and Bohemian Jews?
Russian Jewish Genetics
Are Mountain Jews Descended >from the Khazars?


Rgds
Alan