Bukovina - district or village(s)/shtetls #general


AK <alan.kolnik@...>
 

I have been researching Bukovina and am a bit confused - was it/is it a
general area, like a district, or were there several villages and shtetls as
per Mapquest called Bukovina - or both? Which, if any, were inhabited by
Jews, specifically the painter Artur Kolnik?

Rgds

Alan Kolnik

Remove add-an-n-before-the-dot- and add an "n" after "verizo" to the
address below:

alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net


jerome schatten
 

Alan... A Google search on Bukovina (Bukowina) will tell you more than you
ever wanted to know about this part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. As
regards Artur Kolnik, the painter and jiddishist, he was born April 06, 1890
in Stanislawow, Galicia, lived in Czernowitz, Bukovina between 1918 and
1931, and died in Paris, France in 1972,

See the Czernowitz-L website at http://members.shaw.ca/czernowitz/ that's
where the above information came from.

Best,
Jerome Schatten - webperson for Czernowitz-L
Vancouver, Canada


"AK" <alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net> wrote in message
I have been researching Bukovina and am a bit confused - was it/is it a
general area, like a district, or were there several villages and shtetls
as per Mapquest called Bukovina - or both? Which, if any, were inhabited by
Jews, specifically the painter Artur Kolnik?
Rgds
Alan Kolnik
Remove add-an-n-before-the-dot- and add an "n" after "verizo" to the
address below:


Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Just to add to the confusion there were some villages in the crownland of
Galicia that were called Bukowina (about 10 of them). That is also the
precise spelling of the name of the Austrian Province. "Bukovina" (with a
"V" instead of a "W") is an anglicization of the spelling.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

"Bruce Reisch" <bir1@nysaes.cornell.edu> wrote in message
Alan:


Bukovina was the easternmost "crownland" (a province or district
encompassing numerous cities and villages) of the Austrian Empire.
Today it is split between a portion of western Ukraine and northern
Romania. During Austrian times (pre-WWI), it became a prominent
center of Jewish and Yiddish culture.


Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Alan:

Bukovina was the easternmost "crownland" (a province or district
encompassing numerous cities and villages) of the Austrian Empire.
Today it is split between a portion of western Ukraine and northern
Romania. During Austrian times (pre-WWI), it became a prominent
center of Jewish and Yiddish culture.

The former capital of Bukovina, Czernowitz (today Chernivtsi), is
located in the Ukraine. More information on this city can be found
here:

http://members.shaw.ca/czernowitz/
(Information on an email discussion group regarding Czernowitz and
Sadagura Jewish History and Genealogy may be found at this web site.)

General background on Bukovina:

http://shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/suceava/suceava.htm

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/

http://www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org/

Summary of genealogical resources for Bukovina:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/ReischToronto.html

Maps:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/maps/galicia.jpg
(see lower right corner) or click on the excellent "Maps" link at:
http://members.shaw.ca/czernowitz/

Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York

Subject: Bukovina - district or village(s)/shtetls
From: "AK" <alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net>
Date: Sun, 01 May 2005 15:00:12 GMT


AK <alan.kolnik@...>
 

Thanks to the many people who responded here and privately to my message.

Indeed, I now know, or have at least been exposed to, more about
Bukovina/Bukowina than I ever imagined possible ...

To round out the story for anyone who is interested, there are numerous
Catholic and, I belive, Lutherans, with the name "Kolnik" in Hrachoviste, a
village near Bratislava and Nitra, in Slovakia. It seems likely, but I have
not (yet) proven, that either an origianl Kolnik who was Jewish wne tnorth
east into Bukovina and then to "Poland" (today's Belarus) to the area
between Pinsk and Minsk, or vice versa - migrated >from there to Slovakia.

I had been confused, because Artur Kolnik, a painter of shtetl life, was
variously cited as coming >from Stanislavov, Bukovina, Czernowitz, and
Romania. The SIG helped me clear this up, as described below:

Artur Kolnik was born in Stanislavov, in what was apparently part of the
Austro-Hungarian empire (today it's in the Ukraine, and has been renamed
Ivano-Frankivsk. (See http://www.kyivweekly.com/english/article/?484).
He moved to Czernowitz, the capital of Bukovina, in 1918 (probably something
to do with WWI). It turns out that in 1919, as part of the reshaping of the
borders after WWI, Czernowitz, in Bukovina, and the Bukovina area was given
to Romania in 1919.

So, that clears up another part of the Kolnik story - there was not some
ancestral group in Romania named Kolnik (although the Bukovina history on
Jewish Gen provides thorough evidence that many Jews actually were early
settlers in what is today Romania in Roman time after the destruction of the
Temple, so who knows???) - Arthur Kolnik just happened to move to a place
that was handed over to Romania, and was originally part of the same general
area as Hrachoviste (Slovakia/Hungary/Bukovina etc.).

Rgds
Alan Kolnik

Remove add-an-n-before-the-dot- and add an "n" after "verizo" to the
address below:
alan.kolnik@add-an-n-before-the-dot-verizo.net