Topics

Jurjew #general


Dr. Trevor Waner
 

At the bottom of a photograph of my great grandfather is written the word
Jurjew. I looked this up in the internet and it seems to be a town in
Poland. That is strange because my family comes >from Lithuania. Has anyone
information about this town, its Jewish inhabitants, etc.

Looking forward hearing about this.

Best regards and Shabbat Shalom,

Trevor Waner
Rehovot, Israel


Judith Romney Wegner
 

"That is strange because my family comes >from Lithuania."

The point of this is that we have to 'interpret' our family stories
to figure out how they meant the information. 'Lithuanian', for
example, rarely meant a nation, but rather a philosophy or
subdivision of Eastern European Ashkenazi Judaism. If you were not
Lithuanian, you were probably a Galicianer, and if you were not a
Galicianer, you were probably Lithuanian - regardless of where you
lived in Eastern Europe.
Sally Bruckheimer

I think Sally has got this exactly right -- except for one small
detail: the term those wannabee "intellectuals" would have used was
undoubtedly not "Lithuania" but "Litvak" -- which has quite a
different ring to it, carrying as it does all those psychological
nuances!

Lithuania, like Poland or Galicia, describes only that geographic
country or region; but I think we all have a mental concept of
exactly what we mean when we refer to our ancestors as Litvaks,
Polaks, or Galitzianers -- not forgetting Yekkes, of course, one
dare not overlook the Yekkes! (-: ) (I suppose none of these
terms are p.c. nowadays, more's the pity -- I think we lose more than
we gain by dropping them.

So the family of the original questioner may not actually have "come
from" Lithuania at all. They were philosophical and psychological
Litvaks, though living wherever the records indicate!

Judith Romney Wegner


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

My grandmother's family was also Lithuanian - specifically they said,
Augustow. Of course, there was no Lithuania for centuries before the 20th
century; Lithuanian was the term for the generally self-described
'intellectual', Northern, largely non-Chassidic Jews of
Russia/Poland/Prussia/whatever. Augustow was actually in Suwalki gubernia
of the Kingdom of Poland. The area was not ever Lithuania when this family
was there. And actually, they were >from Augustow District and not >from the
city itself.

The point of this is that we have to 'interpret' our family stories to
figure out how they meant the information. 'Lithuanian', for example,
rarely meant a nation, but rather a philosophy or subdivision of Eastern
European Ashkenazi Judaism. If you were not Lithuanian, you were probably a
Galicianer, and if you were not a Galicianer, you were probably Lithuanian -
regardless of where you lived in Eastern Europe.

Similarly, 'Augustow' is interpreted as the Augustow area. Jurjew, on the
other hand, was never (as far as I know) a district city or even a 'big
city', so it is more likely that they lived there or in an even smaller town
nearby.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

With apologies to all Lithuanians and Galicianers who would describe these
two groups differently.

"That is strange because my family comes >from Lithuania."


Evelyn Waldstein
 

At the bottom of a photograph of my great grandfather is written the word
Jurjew.
Jurjew was a small town known also as Dorpat and in to-day Estonia as
Tartu. It was famous for its well known liberal University many Jews >from
the Baltic region and other places in Russia (and not only) tended to get
their higher education as medical doctors, pharmacists, lawyers and other
specialties. Tuition was in Russian and German at those days.

Evelyn Waldstein
mailto:evewa@post.tau.ac.il


Alexander Sharon
 

"Trevor Waner" wrote

At the bottom of a photograph of my great grandfather is written the word
Jurjew. I looked this up in the internet and it seems to be a town in
Poland. That is strange because my family comes >from Lithuania. Has
anyone information about this town, its Jewish inhabitants, etc.

Looking forward hearing about this.

Best regards and Shabbat Shalom,

Juriev is a Russian name of the Estonian town known currently as Tartu
(Dorpat in German).
Search JewishGen and through the Google information about this town and its
Jewish community.
Tartu is considered as the intellectual centre of Estonia and is a main
rival to country capital-Tallinn.

Amongst my friends in South Africa, there were several whos families have
originated >from Kurland (Courland) - the historical territory that is now
divided between modern Estonia and Latvia.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


ac <anitac47@...>
 

"That is strange because my family comes >from Lithuania."

> The point of this is that we have to 'interpret' our family stories
>to figure out how they meant the information. 'Lithuanian', for
>example, rarely meant a nation, but rather a philosophy or
>subdivision of Eastern European Ashkenazi Judaism. If you were not
>Lithuanian, you were probably a Galicianer, and if you were not a
>Galicianer, you were probably Lithuanian - regardless of where you
>lived in Eastern Europe.
>Sally Bruckheimer

In the song, "Rumania" sung by Aaron Lebedeff, if you can understand
Yiddish, you can hear the caricatures of the Litvaks and the Galitzianers.
Down to the fact that Galitzianers liked their foods sweet which, in prior
discussions on this list, have been helpful in tracing family origins! Ya
never know where the information will come from.

Regards,
Anita Citron