Were cousin marriages legal in NY in 1909? #general


Israel P
 

An aunt of my mother's married a man who may have been her first cousin,
in 1909 in Manhattan.

I have ordered the marriage record, intending to see the parents' names,
but it occurs to me that if NY did not allow cousin marriages, the
information on the marriage record may be phoney. (There were recent
immigrants >from Russia and may not have had independent birth
documentation.)

Am I worrying for naught?

Israel Pickholtz


Jill Carrigan <jrljc@...>
 

At that point in NY, they probably would not have cared. I'd still go for
it.

Jill Carrigan

"Israel P" <IsraelP@pikholz.org> wrote

An aunt of my mother's married a man who may have been her first cousin,
in 1909 in Manhattan.

I have ordered the marriage record, intending to see the parents' names,
but it occurs to me that if NY did not allow cousin marriages, the
information on the marriage record may be phoney. (There were recent
immigrants >from Russia and may not have had independent birth
documentation.)

Am I worrying for naught?

Israel Pickholtz


Nachum Tuchman
 

Hi,

My maternal GM's sister married her cousin, supposedly they were first
cousins. I have yet to figure out exactly what there relationship
was, prior to their marriage.

They lived in Scranton, PA. Whatever their relationship was, it was
illegal for them to marry in the state of PA. According to my cousin,
one of their daughters, they married in Binghamton, NY. This was,
according to information that I gleaned >from a census (probably 1930),
in 1909.


On 7/17/05, Israel P <IsraelP@pikholz.org> wrote:

An aunt of my mother's married a man who may have been her first cousin,
in 1909 in Manhattan.
I have ordered the marriage record, intending to see the parents' names,
but it occurs to me that if NY did not allow cousin marriages, the
information on the marriage record may be phoney. (There were recent
immigrants >from Russia and may not have had independent birth
documentation.)
Am I worrying for naught?
Israel Pickholtz
Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel


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Paul Silverstone
 

In 1921 my father's cousin married his niece. They could not do so in
NY as such marriages were illegal, so they went to Rhode Island.
Paul Silverstone

Jill Carrigan wrote:

At that point in NY, they probably would not have cared. I'd still go for
it.

Jill Carrigan

"Israel P" <IsraelP@pikholz.org> wrote

An aunt of my mother's married a man who may have been her first cousin,
in 1909 in Manhattan.

I have ordered the marriage record, intending to see the parents' names,
but it occurs to me that if NY did not allow cousin marriages, the
information on the marriage record may be phoney. (There were recent
immigrants >from Russia and may not have had independent birth
documentation.)

Am I worrying for naught?

Israel Pickholtz


Linda Altman <familysearch@...>
 

Define "cousin" before jumping to conclusions. In many families "cousins"
are not necessarily blood relatives. In my family there were plenty of
cousins who married. Most were not blood relationships. There are a lot of
step and half relationships, and there were a lot of marriages within the
step and half families. It all depends on how we define kin.

Linda ALtman
Rlaeigh, North Carolina
familysearch@bellsouth.net

"Israel P" <IsraelP@pikholz.org> wrote

An aunt of my mother's married a man who may have been her first cousin,
in 1909 in Manhattan.

I have ordered the marriage record, intending to see the parents' names,
but it occurs to me that if NY did not allow cousin marriages, the
information on the marriage record may be phoney. (There were recent
immigrants >from Russia and may not have had independent birth
documentation.)

Am I worrying for naught?

Israel Pickholtz


Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul Silverstone" <paulh2@rcn.com>

In 1921 my father's cousin married his niece. They could not do so in
NY as such marriages were illegal, so they went to Rhode Island.
Paul Silverstone
Hi Paul -

I thought RI was among the more restrictive states, so I was surprised
by your message. But, I went on a hunt and found the marriages
laws of RI at this site.
http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE15/INDEX.HTM

TITLE 15
Domestic Relations
CHAPTER 15-1
Persons Eligible to Marry
SECTION 15-1-1

While the law does prohibit a man >from marrying his niece [see list
of prohibited marriages at site above] There is an exemption for
for any "marriages of kindred" allowed by Jewish religion in Section
15-1-4 of the Domestic Relations laws.

TITLE 15
Domestic Relations
CHAPTER 15-1
Persons Eligible to Marry
SECTION 15-1-4

15-1-4 Marriages of kindred allowed by Jewish religion. - The
provisions of 15-1-1 - 15-1-3 shall not extend to, or in any way
affect, any marriage which shall be solemnized among the Jewish
people, within the degrees of affinity or consanguinity allowed by
their religion.

I wasn't able to find out when this law was written, but it must have
been in place back in 1921.

Lisa