Trade translation #general


Alexander Sharon
 

Leonard Schneider wrote

Trade translation please

On a registration document the trade appears to be Traktora although it is
difficult to read and could be Faktora. I would appreciate any ideas of
his trade please.
Leonard,

Adopted in Polish (and not used nowadays) >from German, "Faktor" means
literally an agent or a middleman.

It has been also used to describe a lease-holder (also known as an
"arendarz") or a manager of the property or business, owned by someone else.

Traktor (tractor) is a bit different issue.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Margaret Mikulska
 

Leonard wrote:

On a registration document the trade appears to be Traktora although it is
difficult to read and could be Faktora. I would appreciate any ideas of his
trade please.
I guess the document is in Polish, isn't it? If so, it's "Faktora",
genitive of "Faktor". The word had various meanings (it's obsolete now).
In 19th / early 20th C it meant "middleman", and I suppose this is the
right translation in this case (in Central-Eastern and Eastern Europe
many Jews acted as middlemen in various matters). Earlier, it could mean
"plenipotentiary". Occasionally the word was also used (in 19th C) to
denote a letter-carrier/postman (>from the French "facteur"), but this
would be in those regions where the influence of French was strong. In a
nutshell, without knowing the context, I think "middleman" is what you need.

-Margaret Mikulska
Princeton, NJ, USA / Warsaw, Poland


Leonard <leonard8899@...>
 

Trade translation please

On a registration document the trade appears to be Traktora although it is
difficult to read and could be Faktora. I would appreciate any ideas of his
trade please.

Leonard Schneider


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

I guess the document is in Polish, isn't it? If so, it's "Faktora",
genitive of "Faktor". The word had various meanings (it's obsolete now).
In 19th / early 20th C it meant "middleman", and I suppose this is the
right translation in this case (in Central-Eastern and Eastern Europe many
Jews acted as middlemen in various matters). Earlier, it could mean
"plenipotentiary". Occasionally the word was also used (in 19th C) to
denote a letter-carrier/postman (>from the French "facteur"), but this
would be in those regions where the influence of French was strong. In a
nutshell, without knowing the context, I think "middleman" is what you
need.

-Margaret Mikulska
Princeton, NJ, USA / Warsaw, Poland
The term "factor" has the same meaning in English English, although it is
rather out of date ie a wholesaler or a dealer.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)