Rabbi and wife buried separately? Why #general


Howie Axelrod <highwind1@...>
 

My GGM was married to an Orthodox Rabbi who was a pillar of the
Scranton , PA religious community for 22 years. He died in 1931. His
wife of 35+ years was killed in an auto accident 7 years earlier in
1924.

In looking for gravestones, we have found only the wife (so far). She
is in her own grave, which surprised me.

What is the Orthodox practice of burial in such a situation? Is there
a religious reason for an Orthodox Rabbi and a wife that pre-deceased
him to be burried separately?

Note, the wife is buried near her grandchilden who pre-deceased her
diying at <1year and age 8 respectively.


Howie

~~~always looking for info on the Libowitz and Zupnick families of
Scranton Area, PA and the Axelrod family of Albany, NY)


seforimlover
 

Well, given that they were orthodox, they might have
kept to a strict interpretation of Jewish law which
keeps the genders apart possibly even after death.

Yehuda Herskowitz

--- Howie Axelrod <highwind1@comcast.net> wrote:

What is the Orthodox practice of burial in such a situation? Is there
a religious reason for an Orthodox Rabbi and a wife that pre-deceased
him to be burried separately?


Adelle Gloger
 

Dear Genners,

Howie Axelrod asked why an Orthodox Rabbi and his wife are not buried next
to each other. I can only answer by giving an example.

My maternal grandfather and his family came >from Tetiev, Kiev Gub. My
maternal side of the family is buried in the Tetiever Cemetery (Orthodox)
in Cleveland, Ohio. In the old section of the cemetery men and women are
buried in separate rows, but never in the same row. Sometimes the rows
alternate (M-W-M-W) and sometimes they do not.

I imagine that as men and women in Orthodox religious rites when alive are
separate, they are separated in death also.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio
agloger@aol.com


Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

My GGP are buried in United Hebrew in the oldest block in the cemetery. They
died in 1911 and 1915 and are buried within the same block, but separately.
The director of the cemetery informed me that at that time, and only for the
oldest blocks in the cemetery, it was the practice for Orthodox to bury men
and women separately. This block has separate men and women's sections.

Sam Schleman


Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

In many Orthodox cemeteries it was the practice to bury women and men on
separate sides of the cemetery. Here in Israel the practice does not exist.
My theory, unconfirmed, is that there were so many second and even third
marriages due to widowhood and divorce, that it was hard to know next to
which spouse to bury the dead. For example, one of my aunts is buried under
her third husband's name on one side of the cemetery and her second husband
is buried on the other side. A non-family member would have no idea that
there was any connection between the two.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

----Original Message-----
From: Howie Axelrod [mailto:highwind1@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, September 05, 2005 2:23 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Rabbi and wife buried separately? Why

My GGM was married to an Orthodox Rabbi who was a pillar of the
Scranton , PA religious community for 22 years. He died in 1931. His
wife of 35+ years was killed in an auto accident 7 years earlier in
1924.

In looking for gravestones, we have found only the wife (so far). She
is in her own grave, which surprised me.

What is the Orthodox practice of burial in such a situation? Is there
a religious reason for an Orthodox Rabbi and a wife that pre-deceased
him to be burried separately?

Note, the wife is buried near her grandchilden who pre-deceased her
diying at <1year and age 8 respectively.