NYC accomodations #general


Doris Frank <dofrank@...>
 

I agree wholeheartedly with Hilary. My husband, Don, and I have attended
several conferences through the years and always stayed at the conference
hotel and found it was the best way of meeting, networking, etc. It is well
worth it!
Doris Frank, JGS of Greater Orlando

-----Original Message-----
From: Hilary Henkin [mailto:hilary@proppersource.com]
Sent: Monday, September 12, 2005 8:23 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: NYC accomodations

In regards to the original posting,

You might also consider staying at the conference hotel, but sharing
the room with a roommate or two.

There is a lot to be gained by being in the conference hotel.
You can leave things in your room during the day, because it would be
easy to go get them if you need them.
You won't spend time traveling which could be spent networking or
doing research. (I've been in White Plains, and it's about a 40+
minute commute into NYC.)
Just being in the hotel (using the elevator or having breakfast, for
example), you might meet someone to chat with and compare information.
You will feel much more like "a part of the group".

Several years ago, I had a conference in NYC (not IAJGS). The other
rep >from our company suggested we stay in a nearby hotel to save
money. I found myself leaving evening events early to avoid being on
the subway or streets late. When I got to the hotel each morning,
people were already chatting over breakfast and coffee, and I felt
left out. And I felt I had to carry everything I might need during
the day, because I didn't want to take the time to go back to my room.

On the other hand, for the last IAJGS NYC conference, I arrived
several days early to do research. I found a roommate, and we stayed
near Chelsea, a less expensive area, much closer to NARA and the NYC
archives. We moved to the conference hotel when the conference
began, adding a third roommate. The hotel provided a rollaway bed at
no charge. (We also had a small refrigerator put in our room,so we
saved additional money by keeping snacks, drinks, leftovers, etc.)

Yes, it was "close quarters", but we didn't spend all that much time
in the room anyway. . . . We were fine.

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

If you look up New York budget accommodation on the Internet you will find
lots of places offering such accommodation. I stayed in such a place 3 years
ago - aimed at students, backpackers etc.

I always obtain a Youth Hostel card when I travel just in case I need to
stay in one. These days you don't generally need to be a member beforehand.

I stayed in the one in Philadelphia which was in a lovely historic house.

Naturally the main thing is to make sure that you and your belongings are
safe.

Nick Landau
London, UK


Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

In regards to the original posting,

You might also consider staying at the conference hotel, but sharing
the room with a roommate or two.

There is a lot to be gained by being in the conference hotel.
You can leave things in your room during the day, because it would be
easy to go get them if you need them.
You won't spend time traveling which could be spent networking or
doing research. (I've been in White Plains, and it's about a 40+
minute commute into NYC.)
Just being in the hotel (using the elevator or having breakfast, for
example), you might meet someone to chat with and compare information.
You will feel much more like "a part of the group".

Several years ago, I had a conference in NYC (not IAJGS). The other
rep >from our company suggested we stay in a nearby hotel to save
money. I found myself leaving evening events early to avoid being on
the subway or streets late. When I got to the hotel each morning,
people were already chatting over breakfast and coffee, and I felt
left out. And I felt I had to carry everything I might need during
the day, because I didn't want to take the time to go back to my room.

On the other hand, for the last IAJGS NYC conference, I arrived
several days early to do research. I found a roommate, and we stayed
near Chelsea, a less expensive area, much closer to NARA and the NYC
archives. We moved to the conference hotel when the conference
began, adding a third roommate. The hotel provided a rollaway bed at
no charge. (We also had a small refrigerator put in our room,so we
saved additional money by keeping snacks, drinks, leftovers, etc.)

Yes, it was "close quarters", but we didn't spend all that much time
in the room anyway. . . . We were fine.

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

The best deal by far in NYC accomodations, aside >from finding a Manhattan
relative or genner willing to put you up for free, might be a hostel run by
nuns, originally for German immigrants. I stayed there a
couple times, many years ago, for $45 a night - instead of $200 or so
elsewhere. It has no decor, unless you count the crucifix over the bed
(which you can ignore, in my opinion); it is clean as a whistle; it is at
on 23rd St near 8th Ave..

If you bring your spouse and don't use the same surname, bring your marriage
license.

If you want the name, write me as I cannot mention it in public.

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NY