"Stangelberger" in German - Translation Please #general


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

adam wrote on 12 nov 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Dear Genners

I need help in translation of German word Stangelberger
It seems to be a family name, not a word in the sense of language.

Names cannot be translated.

Somtimes their meaning can be reconstructed however.

I will try here without much historical validity:

http://dict.leo.org/?search=staengel

http://dict.leo.org/?search=berg

"the man >from the mountain with the [flower]stems" ???

I am sure the natives will have better solutions.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


Miryam Collins <miryam@...>
 

Adam,

Word and name etymology both fascinate me. I could not find Stangelberger
or Stangel, but Berger means "person living on a mountain", >from Old High
German berg "mountain" - >from here:
http://tinyurl.com/7pllf

--
~Miryam Collins~
Auburn, CA


Adam Richter
 

Dear Genners

I need help in translation of German word Stangelberger

Thank you

Adam Richter

RYCHTER -Miedzyrzec Podlaski Area


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Dr Shimon Barak wrote on 13 nov 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Stange in German means pole
Stangelberg means "the hill with the pole"
Stangelberger is somebody living in "the hill with the pole"
Stange is somewhat different >from staengel, staengel.

Probably it means, IMHO:

Somone living in a place called: Stangelberg.

Though I cannot find the place,
there is a family name "von Stangelberg" on Google,
so a geographical location is not unlikely.


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)

MODERATOR NOTE: The "a" with an umlaut in the name "staengel"
was replaced with "ae" to accomodate our system.


Dr.Katalin Got
 

*Like*: Goldberger, Silberberger.I can not translate
Stangel either but believe it has Polish origin or Latin.


Adam,
Word and name etymology both fascinate me. I could not find Stangelberger
or Stangel, but Berger means "person living on a mountain", >from Old High
German berg "mountain" - >from here:
http://tinyurl.com/7pllf

--
~Miryam Collins~
Auburn, CA >>>


Simon Barak
 

Stange in German means pole
Stangelberg means "the hill with the pole"
Stangelberger is somebody living in "the hill with the pole"
Dr Shimon Barak

Dr Katalin Got wrote:

I can not translate Stangel....I could not find Stangelberger or Stangel.....


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Evertjan." < exjxw.hannivoort@interxnl.net > wrote in message
news:Xns970D8546DCC6eejj99@194.109.133.242...

Stange is somewhat different >from staengel, staengel.

Probably it means, IMHO:

Somone living in a place called: Stangelberg.

Though I cannot find the place,
there is a family name "von Stangelberg" on Google,
so a geographical location is not unlikely.
In Switzerland, there is a Luzern-Stangelberg Railway. So presumably there
is a place called Stangelberg but I can't find it.


--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Nick wrote on 14 nov 2005 in soc.genealogy.jewish:


In Switzerland, there is a Luzern-Stangelberg Railway. So presumably
there is a place called Stangelberg but I can't find it.
I don't think so. On Google, there is only one text,
and that is used in many "wiki" look-alike sites.

That railway track goes to Engelberg!!!

So that would be a simple spelling mistake.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Evertjan." <exjxw.hannivoort@interxnl.net> wrote
Op 15 Nov 2005 om 11:43, schreef Tom Venetianer dit:
There are over 3,000 Google entries for the Stangelberger surname, so
it is NOT a mistake, such name exists, and could be derived >from a
place. Also, I wouldn't demean Wikipedia, it is a serious attempt to
create the world's largest cooperative encyclopedia. Tom
Hi Tom,

1 it is not in Wikepedia, afaik, but in lookalikes.

2 if you follow the links to that railway "bahn" it is a branching track
to the terminal station called "Engelberg".

3 I didn't say Stangelberg does not exist, I was the one suggesting that
Stangelberger is not a man on a hill, but a man in a place called
Stangelberg.

4 There is even a family name "von Stangelberg" in Google.

I only think that that link to a railway station is a mistake, and the
place probably is not in Switserland.

Since the place cannot be found by contemporary map-engines,
[<http://www.viamichelin.com/> has a country entry "Europe", very
usefull,] I would wager, it is a place in eastern Europe, long since
renamed to a Slavic name.

However, it is not[yet?] in ShtetlSchleppers.
In fact, if you study the 3,000+ results on Google all but 300 are in
German, which doesn't suggest that it is a specifically Jewish name.

In fact, there was apparently a film in 1940 "Wiener G'schichten" where
there was a character of that name.

There was also apparently an Austrian artist called Rudolf Stangelberger.

If I key in do a search on Stangelberger and Jewish or Judisch, I obtain no
results. Whereas if I key in Landau and Jewish I obtain 55,000 results which
with possibly suggests that this is not a particularly Jewish name.

Do you have particular evidence that this is a Jewish name. After all this
might be like the Sherlock Holmes case of the dog that didn't bark.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov,
Belarus)


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Op 15 Nov 2005 om 11:43, schreef Tom Venetianer dit:
There are over 3,000 Google entries for the Stangelberger surname, so
it is NOT a mistake, such name exists, and could be derived >from a
place. Also, I wouldn't demean Wikipedia, it is a serious attempt to
create the world's largest cooperative encyclopedia. Tom
Hi Tom,

1 it is not in Wikepedia, afaik, but in lookalikes.

2 if you follow the links to that railway "bahn" it is a branching track
to the terminal station called "Engelberg".

3 I didn't say Stangelberg does not exist, I was the one suggesting that
Stangelberger is not a man on a hill, but a man in a place called
Stangelberg.

4 There is even a family name "von Stangelberg" in Google.

I only think that that link to a railway station is a mistake, and the
place probably is not in Switserland.

Since the place cannot be found by contemporary map-engines,
[<http://www.viamichelin.com/> has a country entry "Europe", very
usefull,] I would wager, it is a place in eastern Europe, long since
renamed to a Slavic name.

However, it is not[yet?] in ShtetlSchleppers.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I think I must have got shunted onto a sidings on the
Engelberg to Stangelberger scenic railway, as I no
longer follow the genealogical context of this
discussion! I can however tell you that:

1. STANGELBERGER is a bona fide very Austrian name
[Tyrol perhaps?] and that there are 14 listed in the
on-line telephone directory of Austria today. I doubt
very much that they are Jewish - in fact looking at
the website of a pedigree German Shepherd dog called
Britta vom Stangelberg gave me a distinct cold chill.

2. Tragically there are hundreds of people called
STANGEL and variants murdered in the holocaust [see
Yad vashem] and not one STANGELBERGER. You would have
been more likely to find a STANGELBERGER camp guard
than an inmate.

3. Stangel, as has been stated, is a small stake or
stick - immortalised in the Salzstangerl, an Austrian
savoury cheese straw without cheese, but sprinkled
with salt. We all know what a *berg* is, but that is
irrelevant.

4. There is one Jew called Franziska STANGELMAYR
listed in Austrian State archives asset files for 1938
[dob 10 April 1890].
We can then find her buried in the Zentralfriedhof,
Vienna as Fanny: aged 54 died 07.04.1944 Gate 4 19k 11
17.

Fanny, confirms the existence of four-syllable Jewish
STAN-GEL-xxx-xxx surnames.

5. There are many Jewish families named STACHELBERG
[prickly mountain] to be found in Poland and Galicia
[spelled in Polish variants]. A Stachelbeere is a
gooseberry - so why not variants STANGELBERG and
STANGELBERGER - to sound super-Austrian?

Perhaps we should have looked under the gooseberry
bush for a tentative explanation of this name [if we
need to find one!] and not at the scenic Swiss
mountain railway?

Celia Male [U.K.]