Connecting to distant cousins #general


ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

I've written on this before but I'll elaborate:

Several months ago I requested members of this group to put me in touch with
Allen,a distant cousin of mine in Chicago. Within 2-3 days that cousin
contacted me and he updated me on the details of his family for the family
tree I coordinate.

Within another few days I was contacted by George,a cousin of this cousin
(>from "the other side") who was also preparing a family tree of "his side"
and he wanted to include my whole family into his project.

After ongoing correspondence with George (by the way these are all true
first names) he put me on to Dan, an American couple who immigrated to
Israel in the 80's and that their son had married one of my distant cousin
(whose grandparents were in my tree), and he joined the loop of the family
information which was being shared by so many members of the family who
never knew each other before I asked members of this group to help me out
with one cousin (Allen).

As we say in hebrew "kol Hakavod to all of you". (If someone knows a real
english translation of that please post).

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel


Judith Romney Wegner
 

As we say in hebrew "kol Hakavod to all of you". (If someone knows a real
english translation of that please post).

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel
Actually, many English-speaking Jews wouls simply say "kol ha-kavod."
Among my acquaintances, the expression is almost as well known as
"Shabbat Shalom!" even among people who don't know much Hebrew.

As for translating "kol hakavod to all of you" (i.e. when many
people are involved, as here) you can say "Congratulations all
round."

If it's only one person, you could try: "More power to you!" But
the translation that best catches the flavour of the original may be
the Australian expression: "Good on yer!"

Judith Romney Wegner

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Lisa Lepore <llepore@...>
 

As we say in hebrew "kol Hakavod to all of you". (If someone knows a real
english translation of that please post).

Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel
Just today I was trying to find the translation of another Hebrew term
someone wrote in a message to me. I found this page, which is a faq for the
newsgroup soc.genealogy.jewish

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/judaism/FAQ/11-Miscellaneous/section-4.html

It provides a list of commonly used phrases - the ones that are
considered to be so common, it's assumed everyone would know them.

They give this translation -

"Kol Hakavod (literal translation: all honor)
Used idiomatically to express praise or congratulations for an
achievement [H]"

The [H] is for Hebrew, because they also have Yiddish words there [Y]

Hope this helps,
Lisa
llepore@comcast.net

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