Czech geography 1938 - 1942 #general


Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Caroline Ranald Curvan has received information from
the Red Cross regarding her gt-uncle, David Jan
ZINKER. Several locations are mentioned with which she
is not familiar, namely:

1. In 1938 the Prague Police Directorate listed his
home-residence as Drozdova, region Horovice.

2. On 23 February 1942, an investigation was declared
for him because he did not show up at the "Jewish Camp
at Kladen". Caroline asks: What/where was this? At the
time, he was registered as living in Dobrin, region
Roundice-nad-Lubem [see correct spelling below - CM ].
Again, Caroline asks: Where is this?

3 days later, on 26 February 1942, he was deported to
Terezin and >from there to Maly Trostinec.

The first thing I would like to tell Caroline is that
there is a Jewishgen Special Interest Group {SIG}
called Austria-Czech specifically for this region of
the world [Habsburg-Empire region of Austria per se -
as well as Bohemia and Moravia - Czech Republic].
There, she is much more likely to find expert help and
family links than on the General Discussion Group. We
have over 700 helpful and very knowledgeable members
all over the world:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/

Secondly, Bohemia and Moravia had some of the earliest
established Jewish settlements in Europe so the title
of this posting is something of a misnomer!

Horovice is a town 50 km SW of Prague [Bohemia] in the
Berouner Kreis [district]. It was known in German in
the 1700s as Horzowitz [possible origin of Horowitz/
Horvitz] and Jews had lived there since the 1400s, but
were then driven out. At the end of the 18th century
there was a tiny population of Jews - only 4 Jewish
families resided in the town and the villages
surrounding it. The ZINKER family was not there at the
time or anywhere in the Berouner Kreis.

Roudnice nad Labem [note the correct spelling] is
known as Raudnitz in German and lies on the River Elbe
[Labem]. It is 40km NNW of Prague [Bohemia] in the
Rakonitzer Kreis. Jews had lived there since the
mid-1500s. Again, I cannot find any ZINKER families
there in the late 1700s.

Re Kladen: I presume this refers to Kladno in the
Rakonitzer Kreis; 23 Km WNW of Prague: see points 4:11

http://tinyurl.co.uk/cmdl

Tragically, Terezin and Maly Trostinec need no
discussion on this forum - their horrors have been
well-documented.

Celia Male [U.K.]

MODERATOR NOTE: The TinyURL leads to The Dachau Concentration Camp
Memorial Site.


Caroline Ranald Curvan <Caroline.Curvan@...>
 

I've received information >from the Red Cross regarding my Great Uncle, David
Jan ZINKER. There are several locations mentioned with which I am not
familiar. I wonder if anyone here can shed some light on them:

1) In 1938, the Prague Police Directorate listed his home-residence as
Drozdova, region Horovice. Where exactly is this?

2) On 23 February 1942, an investigation was declared for him because he
did not show up at the "Jewish Camp at Kladen". What/where was this? At the
time, he was registered as living in Dobrin, region Roundice-nad-Lubem.
Again, where is this? 3 days later, on 26 February 1942, he was deported to
Terezin and >from there to Maly Trostinec.

He was a chemical engineer, trained at the German Technical University.
Supposedly he worked in a munitions plant/factory between his graduation and
deportation.

Any information is most welcome.

Thank you very much.

Caroline Ranald Curvan
Ossining, NY
Caroline.Curvan@verizon.net


Martin Fischer
 

Caroline,

You requested information on several locations in Czechoslovakia in 1938-42.
In addition to the ShtetlSeeker, which I assume you have already used on
JewishGen, the mapping web sites of Multimap and Expedia offer excellent
map-location tools. Each one has a Soundex system that looks for
near-spellings of location names.

In searching for the places mentioned in your message, I found that it is
best to use both Expedia and Multimap because quite often one will help when
the other one fails to find the likely location.

For Drozdova, Multimap suggested two towns with that exact spelling deep
inside Russia.

But Expedia suggested:
Drozdov, Central Bohemia, Czech Republic
and
Drozdov, Olomouc, Czech Republic

For Kladen, Expedia found:
Kladen, Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, Germany
and
Kladen, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

But Multimap suggested:
Kladno, Stredocesky, Czech Republic

For Dobrin, Multimap suggested places with that name in Russia and Romania.

But Expedia suggested:
Dobrin, Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic
and
Dobring, Upper Austria, Austria
and
Dobrinsko, South Moravia, Czech Republic

The Dobrin you want has to be the first one listed above because, when I
looked for Roundice-nad-Lubem in Expedia, I found:
Roudnice nad Labem, Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic

To see the locations of these places yourself, use the World Search map
option at http://www.multimap.com/
and the mapping part of the Expedia Web site at
http://www.expedia.com/pub/agent.dll?qscr=over&rfrr=-357

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois, USA

The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


Alexander Sharon
 

"Caroline Ranald Curvan" wrote

1) In 1938, the Prague Police Directorate listed his
home-residence as Drozdova, region Horovice.
Where exactly is this?
It is actually Drozdov, located 50 km WSW >from the capital Praha
(Prague), just off the main international road # E50 (Praha-Plzen
segment). District town Horovice is located 7 km East >from Drozdov.

At the time, he was registered as living in Dobrin, region
Roundice-nad-Lubem. Again, where is this?
Dobrin, pron. [Doh bzhin] (at 5026 1418) is located 40 km NNW
from Praha on the right bank of Laba River.
Roudnice nad Labem is close by Dobrin to the West.

Kladno is located 19 miles SSWt >from Roudnice-nad Labem, there is
well developed railway communication system between the towns in
this region.

He was a chemical engineer, trained at the German Technical
University. Supposedly he worked in a munitions plant/factory
between his graduation and deportation.
Town Kladno was known as the centre of coal, steel and
metalworking industry >from the mid 19 century, the famous Karel
Wittgenstein's Poldi Iron works known as Poldihutte was located
there. Around Kladno there are several smaller places known >from
their chemical plants: Rakovnik, Neratovice and Kralupy. Perhaps in
one of them Jan Zinker was employed.

BTW, Kladno industrial complex is similar to the other industrial
conglomerates in Ruhr and Upper Silesia regions.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB