Originally Poland - then Germany #general


Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

Does anyone know how I can find a region which was Poland in
1871/1881 and then Germany in 1891?

My ASTRA/OSTRO/OSTRA/ESTREY/ESTRY family came >from there.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester England

Still researching:-
KAMINSKY (KAMENSHCHIK) >from Yanova (Jonava)and Zeimiai nr Kovno, Lithuania 2)
Norron Eliazar, Harris, Joseph & Sarah DIAMOND >from Kovno Gubernia,
Lithuania 3)  Newman, Emmanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY and their parents
Chana & Yehuda LEWIN >from KROSNIEWICE in Poland  4)  Isaac & Rebecca COHEN  
from Poland 5) Chaim & Rebecca ESTRY (nee GROSSMAN)  a glazier >from Poland
6)  GOLDBERG (possibly SCHELSINGER OR SCHELINGER or SCHLUZITEL) >from Vabalninkas,
Lithuania 7)  George (Gershon) BERLINSKY F>from Charlottenburg in Berlin


Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Technically, there weren't any regions that were Poland in 1871-81,
period. The "Kingdom of Poland" was part of the Russian Empire. There
was no country called Poland between 1795 and 1919.

As far as I know, there were no territorial exchanges between the two
empires during the period you mention. However, the Grand Duchy of
Posen, which was part of the German Empire, had many Polish-speaking
inhabitants.

What leads you to the conclusion that your people lived in such a
place? Are you thinking of documents in different languages?

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ
researching Upper Silesia, etc.

GERRICA@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone know how I can find a region which was Poland in
1871/1881 and then Germany in 1891?

My ASTRA/OSTRO/OSTRA/ESTREY/ESTRY family came >from there.


Alexander Sharon
 

"Roger Lustig" wrote

Technically, there weren't any regions that were Poland in 1871-81,
period. The "Kingdom of Poland" was part of the Russian Empire. There
was no country called Poland between 1795 and 1919.

As far as I know, there were no territorial exchanges between the two
empires during the period you mention. However, the Grand Duchy of Posen,
which was part of the German Empire, had many Polish-speaking inhabitants.
"Grossherzogtum Posen" was rather a short lived entity. Following its
establishment in 1815 (Vienna Congress) it ceased to exist in 1849. This was
an autonomous entity of Prussia, formed to satisfy Polish national
aspiration. Following uprisings in 1846 and 1848, Prussian administration
has changed its name to Provinz Posen.

BTW, Polish speakers were also numerous in the other parts of Prussia: Upper
Silesia, East Prussia and Pomerania.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta