London Jewish Lodges? & Given Name "Babel" #general


Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

In a letter written >from a relative in England circa 1900 the writer
says, in reference to a woman having left her husband: "Now she went
to his lodge & he sends her every week 5 shillings." Were there
Jewish "lodges" in London around that time? I would guess it wasn't a
chevra, because the man wasn't religious. I doubt he was a Mason,
because he was somewhat disreputable.

The woman in question was named "Bable." I wonder if this was a
version of the nickname "Bubele" or something else.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, AZ

BELKIN (Boguslav, Odessa), BOIM (Zasliai), MELNICK, LIBERMAN ha
COHEN, WEISBERG (Dvorets, Pinsk, Pochopovo, Montreal), ORLIN
(Boguslaviskis, Vilnius, Vieves, Zasliai), MEREMINSKY, EPSTEIN
haLevi, HABERMAN, WOLFOWITZ, ZELIVANSKY, YENOWITZ (Slonim, Derechin,
Polonka, Palestine), WOLINSKY/VOLINSKIY (Boguslav, Zvenigorodka,
Stepantsy, Mironovka, Dnipropetrovsk, Odessa, Alexandria, Palestine,
---list truncated at the allowed 6 lines - Mod.---


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

Harold Pollins HPollins@aol.com writes:

"There were many Jewish Friendly Societies whose branches were called
'lodges'. They were, so I understand, a peculiarly British institution,
and were in effect mutual assistance organisations, providing relief to
members and their families who had fallen on hard times."
See http://www.archives.lib.soton.ac.uk/guide/MS180.shtml regarding the
papers of the United Jewish Friendly Society, 1912-80 - which says that the
Society was formed to provide insurance against complete loss of income and
as a means of social life among a group of Jewish refugees who had fled to
Britain to escape religious persecutions in Central and Eastern Europe.

Many British Building Societies (Savings and Loans, US) have the term
"Friendly Society" in the title and one financial website says they were set
up to provide insurance-based services - and is, I believe, related to the
cooperative movement.

I gather that the US equivalent is the "fraternal society". Indeed I note
that the IRS regulations concerning Fraternal Societies is that it must
operate under the "lodge" system.

I have found a list of "Fraternal and Benevolent Societies in St Louis AK".

This includes branches of the "Ancient Order of United Workmen". They were
divided into lodges and their purpose is not dissimilar >from the Jewish
Friendly Society that I started with.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)


HPOLLINS@...
 

There were many Jewish Friendly Societies whose branches were called
'lodges'. They were, so I understand, a peculiarly British institution, and were in
effect mutual assistance organisations, providing relief to members and their
families who had fallen on hard times.

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England
---

In a message dated 10/08/2006 03:18:10 GMT Standard Time,
sorlen@email.arizona.edu writes:
In a letter written >from a relative in England circa 1900 the writer
says, in reference to a woman having left her husband: "Now she went
to his lodge & he sends her every week 5 shillings." Were there
Jewish "lodges" in London around that time? I would guess it wasn't a
chevra, because the man wasn't religious. I doubt he was a Mason,
because he was somewhat disreputable.


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Steve Orlen" <sorlen@email.arizona.edu> wrote:

In a letter written >from a relative in England circa 1900 the writer says,
in reference to a woman having left her husband: "Now she went to his
lodge & he sends her every week 5 shillings." Were there Jewish "lodges"
in London around that time? I would guess it wasn't a chevra, because the
man wasn't religious. I doubt he was a Mason, because he was somewhat
disreputable.
Are you sure this doesn't read lodgings - which would make more sense?

I think that this would be the equivalent of what Americans would call a
"rooming house".

He would have had his own room - or possibly been sharing.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany),
THALHEIMER (Mainbernheim, Germany), KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and
Kleinerdlingen,Germany), LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Russia/Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?)
(Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Russia/Belarus)