Lomza naming patterns #general


Shari Kantrow
 

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:01:27 UTC, sjoysk@yahoo.com (Shari Kantrow) opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples of
surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped >from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

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there.


Alexander Sharon
 

"Shari Kantrow" <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote
Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow
Lomza was part of the Russian Empire and this is the reason that
administration has been following pattern already adopted by the Russians in
assigning surnames for the non-Jewish residents.

Surname once assigned, could not be changed. For this (surname change),
disposition of the highest authority was required.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


tom klein <jewishgen@...>
 

In Russian (and I believe Poland was under Russian rule at the time),
it is still quite normal to list a person's patronymic between their
given and family name.

I believe you are interested in a time period that roughly coincides
with the introduction of fixed family names in Poland (c. 1821), so
there may also have been a mixture or crossover of patronymics and
fixed surnames.

....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Shari Kantrow <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote:

In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow


Alexander Sharon
 

"Stan Goodman" wrote
Shari Kantrow opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples
of surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the
Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.
Actually Stan, in Polish, spelling is Carewicz, and is not not a popular
Polish name.
Rather Krolewicz.

On the other hand, Kantrow is another Russian variation of the surname
making that are ending with -ov, e.g. Pietrov (son of Peter). It is not
"clipped" >from Kantrowicz, it has been developed "directly", depending in
what part of the Empire person was a residents. Names ending with -owicz are
typical to Lithuania - Belarus regions, different pattern were in Podolia or
the southern parts of the Empire.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 12 Aug 2006 (Alexander Sharon) wrote

"Stan Goodman" wrote
Shari Kantrow opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples
of surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the
Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.

Actually Stan, in Polish, spelling is Carewicz, and is not not a popular
Polish name.
Neglectful, on my part. I mustn't listen to the radio when I write. It
wasn't meant to be a name, but exactly the opposite: an illustration of the
same form for a non-name.

Rather Krolewicz.
But I wanted the "-wicz" form that was _not_ a name.

On the other hand, Kantrow is another Russian variation of the surname
making that are ending with -ov, e.g. Pietrov (son of Peter). It is not
"clipped" >from Kantrowicz, it has been developed "directly", depending in
what part of the Empire person was a residents. Names ending with -owicz are
typical to Lithuania - Belarus regions, different pattern were in Podolia or
the southern parts of the Empire.
Therefore my bad example.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 3:12 AM +0000 8/12/06, Alexander Sharon wrote in reply to Stan,
who had said:

"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
> "Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.

Actually Stan, in Polish, spelling is Carewicz, and is not a popular
Polish name.
Many thanks to Alex for straightening that out for us. I consider
him the gold standard when it comes to Slavic surnames, and would
always take his opinion when it conflicts with that of anyone else.
In passing, may I mention the famous British horse race named after
the son of some Czar or other -- perhaps a cousin of Queen Victoria?
The race is the Cesarewitch -- which manages to mangle the spelling
without helping much with the correct pronunciation!

Judith Romney Wegner