Given name Icek Eysyk #general


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/11/2006 10:15:57 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jrw@... writes:

<< Eysyk, Eisig and the English Isaac are all pronounced very much
alike. What I don't understand, though, is how the long "I" sound
gets into Yiddish versions of the name Yitzhak -- because normally it
is only English that gives a long "I" sound to that vowel -- which of
course in the original Hebrew has only the short "i" sound as in the
word "it."

<< Maybe someone can explain to us how one gets >from Icek
(pronounced It-sek) or Izak (pronounced It-zak) to the long "I"
sound in Ei-sig or Ey-syk. >>

==Alexander Beider states in his Dictionary of Ashkenazi Given Names, that
the derivation of Ayzik >from Isac as the result of the diphthongization of
protovowel 34 in Germany was suggested by Weinreich.

==Please, don't anyone call on me to explain what it means. I assume the
source for that comment is Uriel Weinreich, the exponent of modern Yiddish, who
has expired.

Michael Bernet, New York


Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Greg Tuckman posted as follows:

"One of my ancestors, >from Lublin, Poland had the given name of Icek Eysyk.
I have seen this a number of times in the 19th century vital records, but
only in the city of Lublin. The spelling is always different for the first
and second name. Does anyone know if there is a meaning behind this
'double name'?"


Both of the names presented were Polish transliterations and/or variants of
Yiddish names: Icek for Itsek, and Eysyk for Aysik. The Yiddish names
Ayzek and Ayzik were Yiddish kinuim (aliases) for the Hebrew name Yitschak,
while Icek was a common Polish-spelled variant for the Hebrew name Yitschak.

What this amounts to is that it is likely that the Legal Jewish name of the
person would have been Yitschak haMechune Ayzik ben Ploni. Here
"haMechune" is a technical Hebrew term which means "known as" or "alias",
and Ploni is the Legal Given Name of the father of Yitschak Ayzik. The
above is how the Legal Jewish name would have been written in a Get (Jewish
divorce contract, or other contract, e.g., Ketuva). This person would have
been called to an aliya to the Tora using the name: "Yitschak Ayzik ben
Ploni".

Thus, Greg should be on the lookout in archival documents for the names
mentioned here, as well as other variants presented in the JewishGen Given
Names Data Base for Poland, found at the following web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

Search for the Hebrew name "Yitschak" (without the quotation marks).

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Greg Tuckman
 

Hello group,
One of my ancestors, >from Lublin, Poland had the given name of Icek Eysyk.
I have seen this a number of times in the 19th century vital records, but
only in the city of Lublin. The spelling is always different for the first
and second name. Does anyone know if there is a meaning behind this "double
name"?
Thanks for your thoughts.
Greg Tuckman
Tempe, AZ 85282


Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 8:45 AM -0700 9/11/06, Greg Tuckman wrote:
Hello group,
One of my ancestors, >from Lublin, Poland had the given name of Icek Eysyk.
I have seen this a number of times in the 19th century vital records, but
only in the city of Lublin. The spelling is always different for the first
and second name. Does anyone know if there is a meaning behind this "double
name"?
Thanks for your thoughts.
My husband's grandfather, born in Tarnow, Poland, was named
Izak-Eisig. The first name is Hebrew and the second name a
Yiddishization of the Hebrew. To name a boy Icek-Eysyk or Izak-Eisig
is more or less equjivalent to naming him Yitzhak-Isaac -- except
that in English-speaking countries, Isaac would simply be the
English version of his Hebrew name and he would be addressed eithe by
the one name or by the other (but not by both names together as was
common in Yiddish-speaking culture)

Eysyk, Eisig and the English Isaac are all pronounced very much
alike. What I don't understand, though, is how the long "I" sound
gets into Yiddish versions of the name Yitzhak -- because normally it
is only English that gives a long "I" sound to that vowel -- which of
course in the original Hebrew has only the short "i" sound as in the
word "it."

Maybe someone can explain to us how one gets >from Icek (pronounced
It-sek) or Izak (pronounced It-zak) to the long "I" sound in
Ei-sig or Ey-syk.

Judith Romney Wegner


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 17:39:12 UTC, GRTuckman@... (Greg Tuckman) wrote:

Hello group,
One of my ancestors, >from Lublin, Poland had the given name of Icek Eysyk.
I have seen this a number of times in the 19th century vital records, but
only in the city of Lublin. The spelling is always different for the first
and second name. Does anyone know if there is a meaning behind this "double
name"?
Thanks for your thoughts.
Greg Tuckman
Tempe, AZ 85282
It isn't a double name, it's a stutter: Icek/Ick/<any other variant> is a
spelling according to Polish rules. By English rules, the same sounds might
be rendered "Itzik", which is how the Yiddish of Polish Jews might pronounce
the Hebrew "Yitzh.ak".

Eizik/Eysyk/<any other variant> should be more obvious as "Isaac", which is
what European languages do to Hebrew "Yitzh.ak".

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

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