"Memel" as given name #general


Lancy
 

Have just found that my grandfather (in Eastern Galicia) had a sister named Memel.

Does anybody know the meaning or origin of this name?

Lancy Spalter
Kfar Tavor, Israel

Moderator Note: The Jewish Given Names Database is a wealth of information -
you can find it at: http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/


MBernet@...
 

lspalter@netvision.net.il writes:

<< . . a sister named Memel.Does anybody know the meaning or origin of this name?

=It's derived >from Mamele. Beider suggests that Mamele is derived at times >from
the Sephardic-Hebrew Maimona, and >from the Slavic Maminka [little mother].

=Memel is the German name for a territory in Lithuania around the seaport Klaipeda.
It was an independent state after WW 2 and was grabbed by the Germans in an
Anschluss preceding WW 2.

Michael Bernet


Alexander Sharon
 

O.K.

Michael Bernet wrote:

It's derived >from Mamele. Beider suggests that Mamele is derived at times from
the Sephardic-Hebrew Maimona, and >from the Slavic Maminka [little mother].

Memel is the German name for a territory in Lithuania around the seaport
Klaipeda. It was an independent state after WW 2 and was grabbed by the Germans
in an Anschluss preceding WW 2.
Isn't "memel" (mem, mem, lamed) is a part of crushing machinery of an olive
press? At least this how Talmud sage Rabbi Abba bar Memel explains the meaning of
his name.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

MBernet@aol.com wrote:
lspalter@netvision.net.il writes:

Memel is the German name for a territory in Lithuania around the seaport Klaipeda.
It was an independent state after WW 2 and was grabbed by the Germans in an
Anschluss preceding WW 2.
...after having been grabbed by the Lithuanians in 1923. I assume you
meant "independent state after WW I"; in fact, after WW I it was an
Entente/League of Nations protectorate that was supposed to be
self-governing like Danzig, but never was. For the previous 670 years
Memel had been a Prussian city; Lithuania's behavior toward the local
ethnic majority (a minority within Lithuania) was less than exemplary.

The Nazis did indeed grab the port city, and this was without question
illegal and wrong, but nobody had acquitted themselves particularly well
in governing the area between the wars.

All of which has nothing to do with the issue of given names...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA