Surname HAENLE #general


Steve Orlen
 

Dear Folks,

Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish) surname HAENLE means?

Best, Steve Orlen Tucson Arizona


Irene Newhouse
 

It would NOT at all surprise me if a name had multiple meanings
in its origins -- our ancestors probably were not above punning,
and since they usually spoke/understood multiple languages -
Hebrew for religious purposes, Yiddish [or not] for every day use at
home & another language or 2 for when dealing with the goyim, --
multilingual puns are not out of the question either, & depending
on the personality of the ancestors making the decision to take the name,
might have been viewed as a plus.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


MBernet@...
 

sorlen@email.arizona.edu writes:
<< Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish) surname HAENLE means >>

==As a given name, Beider sees the source as the biblical Yochanan via the German
-> Johannes -> Hans.

==As a surname Lars Menk, in his dictionary of German-Jewish surnames, concurs in
Yochanan as the source.

==I venture, as a guess, that it might be derived >from Hahn, a rooster, used as a
house sign. or it might be one of the many names (Heiman, Heiman, Heinz, Hyum)
derived >from Chaim, a Hebrew first name meaning life

Michael Bernet, New York
mbernet@aol.com


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Steve Orlen wrote:
Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish) surname HAENLE means?
Probably Yiddish diminuative [Hahnele?] of German "Hahn" [= rooster, cock, adult
male domestic chicken ]

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Steve Orlen wrote: Can someone tell me what the German (Jewish)
surname HAENLE means? Michael Bernet and Evertjan Hannivoort made
suggestions around the first name Johannes and the word for rooster.

Irene Newhouse >from Hawaii added to the discussion with the comment:
" It would NOT at all surprise me if a name had multiple meanings
in its origins -- our ancestors probably were not above punning,
and since they usually spoke/understood multiple languages -
Hebrew for religious purposes, Yiddish [or not] for every day use
at home & another language or 2 for when dealing with the goyim, --
multilingual puns are not out of the question either...."

I would like to point out that no-one has yet mentioned that HAENLE
is a bona-fide *non-Jewish* family name in Germany and Austria -
I wonder if they too are thinking of hidden meanings?
The Jewish family name may therefore well have been chosen to
blend in with the population at large, with the added bonus, perhaps,
{but not necessarily so] of having another deeper hidden-meaning,
based on a Hebrew word or name. I cannot vouch for this, but Kaganoff
in his 1977 book on family names says "HAHN became a by name for
several Hebrew first names such as Hanoch, Elhanan and Manoah."

Sounds a good enough reason to choose HAENLE to me!

Celia Male - London, U.K.