FLEGENHEIMER #general


Ron Arons
 

Steve,

You probably know that the real name of the famous gangster
"Dutch Schultz" was Arthur Flegenheimer.

Ron Arons
Oakland, CA
www.jewsofsingsing.com


Does anyone know the etymology of FLEGENHEIMER?
All I can think of is "flatlander."
Does anyone have a FLEGENHEIMER on their tree?


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 22 aug 2008 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Does anyone know the etymology of FLEGENHEIMER?
All I can think of is "flatlander."
Does anyone have a FLEGENHEIMER on their tree?
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant
of the theoretical stetl "Flegenheim",
though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".

Perhaps more to the point, a "Pflegeheim" is a nuring home.

You probably know that the real name of the famous gangster
"Dutch Schultz" was Arthur Flegenheimer.

Ah yes, te "Beer Baron of the Bronx", his father had a saloon there.
<http://tinyurl.com/64m8eo>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Schultz>
<http://www.feastofhateandfear.com/archives/dutch.html>

The name FLEGENHEIM also appears as a family name,
like Mrs. Alfred, Frau Antoinette Flegenheim,
on board of the Titanic, a resident of Berlin.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Roger Lustig wrote on 23 aug 2008 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Evertjan. wrote:
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant of the theoretical
stetl "Flegenheim", though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".
When in doubt, check Lars Menk's A Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames.

He reports that the name means "person >from Flehingen."
The earliest examples he has used both FLEHINGER and FLEGENHEIMER.
FLEHENHEIMER was also known.
Flehingen, 30 km NE of Karlsruhe:
< http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1770368 >
< http://www.evilsnake.com/Genealogy/Flehingen.html >

Even so, I cannot see the jump >from FLEHINGER to FLEGENHEIMER,
unless the name FLEGENHEIM is reported for FLEHINGEN,
and the below gives some clues to that:

< http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberderdingen > says:
"Flehingen wurde 778/79 als Flancheim erstmals erwähnt."

It seems that that place started as a "heim/heem/hem/ham/um" name,
as there are so many in England, Netherlands andwestern Germany,
[like Wokenham, Arnhem, Manheim], all having the same root as "home".

So FLEGENHEIMER could be a derivative of something like FLANCHEIMER.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)

MODERATOR NOTE: The "Wikipedia/Oberderdingen" site is in German.


Roger Lustig
 

When in doubt, check Lars Menk's A Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames.

He reports that the name means "person >from Flehingen."
The earliest examples he has used both FLEHINGER and FLEGENHEIMER.
FLEHENHEIMER was also known.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Evertjan. wrote:
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant of the theoretical
stetl "Flegenheim", though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".


Eric Svirskis
 

Although I don't speak German & only understand only a little Yiddish
"Flyinghammer" metaphorically springs to mind. There are many
misspellings in our family name (18 & rising!) so I it occurred to me
that the "Flegen" part is corrupted >from "Fleigen" meaning flight or
flying. I wonder about the "heimer" part: it may (possibly, more
probably) mean "home" (as in "haymischer) therefore "Flyinghome"

BTW a quick Google search on the surname brought up a number of hits
including a small Tree of (possibly a different) Arthur FLEGENHEIMER as
part of a KAMINSKY family.

Eric Svirskis
Melbourne, Australia.
svire@melbpc.org.au

Interested in: FLEXER, GANTOVNIK, GESKIN, GROSSBEIN, MUSZKATBLAT,
OKUN, SRAGOWITZ, SVIRSKI, SVIRSKIS or SWIRSKY, & ZILBERMAN -
mainly >from Lthuania: Danilovichiai/Draustine, Dolhinov, Kovno/Kaunas,
Panevesz/Panecevysz, and Widze/Vidzy (now Belarus).

Does anyone know the etymology of FLEGENHEIMER?
All I can think of is "flatlander."
Does anyone have a FLEGENHEIMER on their tree?


Roger Lustig
 

There's no jump to be seen! As I said, the earliest holders of the name
that Menk knows of called themselves *both* FLEHINGER and FLEGENHEIMER.

As I also said: when in doubt, check Menk. He notes that "Flegenheim"
was a popular name for Flehingen. "Flechtheim" and "Flehenheim" were
other variants.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research co-ordinator, GerSIG

Evertjan. wrote:

Roger Lustig wrote on 23 aug 2008 in soc.genealogy.jewish:
Evertjan. wrote:
Flegenheimer seems to me an inhabitant of the theoretical
stetl "Flegenheim", though ShtetlSeeker cannot find it
which has, in German, nothing to do with "flat".
When in doubt, check Lars Menk's A Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames.

He reports that the name means "person >from Flehingen."
The earliest examples he has used both FLEHINGER and FLEGENHEIMER.
FLEHENHEIMER was also known.
Flehingen, 30 km NE of Karlsruhe:
< http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetm~-1770368 >
< http://www.evilsnake.com/Genealogy/Flehingen.html >

Even so, I cannot see the jump >from FLEHINGER to FLEGENHEIMER,
unless the name FLEGENHEIM is reported for FLEHINGEN,
and the below gives some clues to that:

< http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberderdingen > says:
"Flehingen wurde 778/79 als Flancheim erstmals erwähnt."

It seems that that place started as a "heim/heem/hem/ham/um" name,
as there are so many in England, Netherlands andwestern Germany,
[like Wokenham, Arnhem, Manheim], all having the same root as "home".

So FLEGENHEIMER could be a derivative of something like FLANCHEIMER.