Male as the first name on a Certificate #general


Walter Greenspan
 

Linda Morzillo asks, "I just want to clarify that if a name has not been chosen, as
was in the case on my father's birth certificate, the first name was Male (or
Female). Why would a name had not been chosen or stated at the time of birth?"

As I understand it, Jewish custom is to name on the 8th, or Circumcision, day; and,
if a baby dies before the 8th day, there is no name. New York State requires a name
for a birth certificate no later than the third day.

Thus, many Jewish children have the first name of "male" or "female" for the
official birth certificate and, when they reach their majority, many, but possibly
not all, of these now young adults go to New York State Supreme Court (each of the
62 current counties in New York State has a New York State Supreme court) and
change the name on their birth certificate.

I hope this information is useful or, at least, interesting.

Wishing all a Ziessen Pesach (a sweet Passover),

Walter Greenspan
Great Falls, MT & Jericho, NY


Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

When I visited the Jewish Historical Museum in Manchester, England, some years ago,
one of the exhibits was a register book kept by one particular midwife, in the
early years of the 20th century, as I recall. The description clearly implied that
keeping such a register was a standard practice.

I wonder if midwives in the US did that, too. I can see the same sort of errors
described by Allan being recorded in a register book on the scene if there was
hustle and bustle, and chaos associate, for example, with an unexpectedly early
labor or the development of some problem - or just other children making a scene.
But I can also see a register book being a reasonable thing for a midwife to create
as a memory aide if she were going to formally record births on a less than daily
basis.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com

<Aejordan@aol.com> wrote:

I just want to clarify that if a name has not been chosen, as was in the case on
my father's birth certificate, the first name was Male (or Female). Why would
a name had not been chosen or stated at the time of birth?


Judith Cohen <judith.cohen@...>
 

I was born in a Brooklyn hospital in 1970 and my birth certificate says Female,
there was an addendum/change on the back of the original certificate with my actual
name. It looks like a stamp that was then filled in with the name and date and
signature, which was just shy of a month after I was born.

Judith

genealogynewsgal@yahoo.com writes:
I just want to clarify that if a name has not been chosen, as was in the case on
my father's birth certificate, the first name was Male (or Female).


Myrna Levin
 

Here is a twist on the discussion of first name on documents. When I found my
grandmother's sister's Ellis Island arrival. It said "Male B,,,", gender said
"female". Reading this "Male" >from an American/English perspective it seemed
confusing. Not at all. Her name was Molly and perhaps this is how it might have
been written in the "old country", or the documentor couldn't spell Molly.

Is there a masculine name "Male" that might also fall into this category of
spelling variations?

Myrna Nadel Levin
mlevin@rgv.rr.com
McAllen, TX

SEARCHING: NADELSTECHER, Sanok, Zahutyn, Poland and surroundings
FEIT/NADELSTECHER; BERTENTHAL/NADELSTECHER connections


A. E. Jordan
 

mlevin@rgv.rr.com writes:
It said "Male B,,,", gender said "female". Reading this "Male" >from an American/
English perspective it seemed confusing. Not at all. Her name was Molly and perhaps
this is how it might have been written in the "old country", or the documentor
couldn't spell Molly.

The families and the midwives both may not have had a strong command of the English
language in those days. At least it could have been strongly accented or spelling
might have been a real challenge. Years ago someone here on the list told a story
of looking at a document and not being able to figure it out until they put
themselves in the shoes of their ancestor and pronounced the world with the accent
they imagined the ancestor to have and then the document made perfect sense. So
maybe your ancestor was saying Molly or Mere and the recorder heard Male B.

Allan Jordan


Joseph Hirschfield
 

mlevin@rgv.rr.com writes:
"Here is a twist on the discussion of first name on documents. When I found my
grandmother's sister's Ellis Island arrival. It said 'Male B,,,', gender said
'female'. Reading this 'Male' >from an American/English perspective it seemed
confusing. Not at all. Her name was Molly..."

Male is a name that was used in the "old country. It was also spelled Malie and
pronounced molly. It is short for Machle. When coming to America, with someone
saying their name was Malie, it could easily have been written down as Molly. Or
else the person later adopted the name Molly, a common practice of Americanizing
one's "old country" name.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
HIRSCHFELD,
HIRSZFELD,LINDENBAUM,BUCHSBAUM,BUXBAUM,BUCKSBAUM-Skwarzawa,Sielec Bienkow,
Glinyany, Novyy Jaryczow-GALICIA MINOFF, MINOWICKI, MINOWITZKI-Brest Litovsk,
Wysokae Litovsk-BELARUS


Jeff Hecht <jeffhecht@...>
 

Soyamaven@aol.com wrote:

As I understand it, Jewish custom is to name on the 8th, or Circumcision,
day; and, if a baby dies before the 8th day, there is no name. New York State
requires a name for a birth certificate no later than the third day.

Thus, many Jewish children have the first name of "male" or "female" for the
official birth certificate and, when they reach their majority, many, but
possibly not all, of these now young adults go to New York State Supreme Court
(each of the 62 current counties in New York State has a New York State Supreme
court) and change the name on their birth certificate.
This does not just happen among Jewish families. When I checked my
non-Jewish grandmother's 1891 birth record in Saratoga Springs, New
York, it did not list her name, and city officials did not mention any
correction in responding to my question about her given name at birth.

Jeff Hecht