Is Fannie/Fanny a Nickname? #general


Carol Raspler
 

Dear Cousins:
I I don't think I've seen too many Fanny(s) being listed on the passenger
manifests >from Europe, but it was a most popular name for Jewish ladies
new to the United States >from before the turn of the 20th c. Would it have
represented a "Yankee" version of Frances? or Feige? or Fruma? etc.
What are your thoughts and opinions?
Regards, Carol Raspler, Delray Beach, FL


Roger Lustig
 

Carol:
Fanny was the given name of my great-grandmother, who was born in
Prussia in 1869 (and whom I got to meet when I was 4). It was a
hypocoristic (literally: "babytalk"; diminutive or child-form) form of
Frances, Franziska, etc., but often also the name actually registered.
And at least in the area where my great-grandmother was born and raised,
it was often given to girls whose "Hebrew" name was Feigele.

Where did your Fanny come from?

Best,

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA


Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Fanny is a pet name for Frances in the English-speaking world, but was also
used as a name in its own right. It was VERY popular in the 19th century
and very early 20th century, but became less popular as it became more
commonly used as a common name for a part of the human anatomy.

Nevertheless, during the height of the East European immigration it was a
very popular female name and was commonly used as the Yankee name by many
immigrant women whose European personal names began with the letter "F". It
was certainly widely, but not universally, used for Feige and Fruma, and for
many other names.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com


Rakoff125
 

I have seen many Fani/ Fany names recorded in birth, marriage, death
records and the 1869 census [as available through H-Sig ]. It seems to
have been very popular in my family who were clustered in the
Nyitra Megye in the early 19th century before moving to Budapest and
Vienna. It appears to be the given name and not a nickname for anything.
Linda
Linda Rakoff
Newton, Massachusetts, USA
searching: ASCHNER-Assakurte, Beuthen/Bytom,Berlin, Brezova p. Bradlom,
Breslau/Wroclaw, Chorzow [Konigshutte], Berko, Bratislava, Budapest,
Cakovec, Danzig, Hradiste, Katlo, Kattowitz, Nyitra, Kosice, Spisska Nova Ves,
Warsaw, Wien, Zagreb LIFSITZ-Galati; GOLDMAN(N), LANGER -Kosice, Bolyar;
Miskolc, Presov; LOW'Y-Brezova, Hradiste, Spisska Nova Ves MELTZER, PERLBINDER,
LADENHEIM-- Horodenka, Galicia RAKOFF-Keilce, RIESENBERG- Horodenka,


news@...
 

craspler@bellsouth.net (Carol Raspler) writes:
I I don't think I've seen too many Fanny(s) being listed on the passenger
manifests >from Europe, but it was a most popular name for Jewish ladies
new to the United States >from before the turn of the 20th c. Would it have
represented a "Yankee" version of Frances? or Feige? or Fruma? etc.
Fanny or Fannie is a diminutive of Frances. It was a very popular name among
non-Jews in the United States in the 19th century. Jews who adopted this name
might have used it to replace a Yiddish name starting with the F sound, likely
Feiga, Frayda, Fruma or their variants, or something completely unrelated.

Robert Israel israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada


Vivian Kahn <viviankahn@...>
 

Fani is a very common Hungarian female name. Check the All Hungary Database for
Given Name is Exactly Fani and thousands of records will be identified. Feiga is
probably the most frequent Yiddish version but Frimka also shows up in my records.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA
Hungarian SIG Coordinator

From: "Carol Raspler" <craspler@bellsouth.net>
I I don't think I've seen too many Fanny(s) being listed on the passenger
manifests >from Europe, but it was a most popular name for Jewish ladies new to
the United States >from before the turn of the 20th c. Would it have represented
a "Yankee" version of Frances? or Feige? or Fruma? etc.


henry
 

My gggrandmother was born Vogel (in Holland) and known as Fanny in England.

Henry Best,
London

Carol Raspler wrote:
Would it have represented a "Yankee" version of Frances? or Feige? or Fruma?etc.
MODERATOR NOTE: There is no one correct answer to Carol's question, as have been
noted in this thread, the are many reasons for someone to be known as "Fanny".
Check the JewishGen Given Names database for more information
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/search.htm


Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Though I have written to the original poster of the Fanny question", I thought I'd
put my 2 cents in and address the discussion group, since it seems a "thread"
began! My Mother emigrated >from Lemberg, Austria in 1901. Her given name,as listed
on the Immigration and Passenger List, was Pepe, her Yiddish name was Perel
[pronounced Peh-el]. Her arrival card lists Jenny, her Marriage License: Fanny
[ which became her legal name]. Some documents list her name as Fannie. Two first
cousins were also named Fanny.

In later years, after retiring and moving to Florida, she disliked the name Fanny
and began calling herself Fran!

Go figure it!

Sylvia

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Genealogy Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, Florida

From: Roger Lustig <GerSIG.Research@verizon.net>
Fanny was the given name of my great-grandmother, who was born in Prussia in 1869
(and whom I got to meet when I was 4). It was a hypocoristic (literally:
"babytalk"; diminutive or child-form) form of Frances, Franziska, etc., but often
also the name actually registered...


Ward, Fern <fern.ward@...>
 

My Yiddish name is Fruma Rachel - named after my Grandmother Fannie >from Eastern
Europe. The name Fannie is on her marriage and death certificate.

FYI
Fern Ward

Researching: ZELMANOVICS (>from Maramaros Szighet), KATZ (>from Maramaros Szighet)