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Were there quotas to US emigration around 1912? #general


philafrum
 

Dear Genners:

Were there any quotas in existence which would have limited emigration to
the US around 1912?

I ask because a oousin contends that her father-in-law (my grandmother's
older brother) was unable to enter the US then and therefore had to emigrate
to Argentina.

Interestingly, my grandmother and her sister emigrated to the US in December
1911.

Thanks for your input.

Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net

Researching: LISNITZER, MANDELSTEIN, ADELMAN, PRESSEISEN, UDIN, BURSTEIN,
WINARSKY (all >from Ukraine)
FISHMAN--Terespol (now in Poland)


Susan&David
 

Quota legislation is summarized on this web-site:
http://www-lib.iupui.edu/kade/adams/chap10.html
Does not appear to be anything significant to limit immigration >from
Europe 1912 or earlier

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Evan Fishman wrote:

Were there any quotas in existence which would have limited emigration to
the US around 1912?
Evan Fishman
ebf2001@comcast.net


David Oseas <doseas{nospam}@...>
 

"Evan Fishman" <ebf2001@comcast.net> wrote
Were there any quotas in existence which would have limited emigration to
the US around 1912?
I'm not aware of any quotas in existence before the Immigration Act of 1924
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_immigration_legislation).

There must have been some other influencing factor at that time, since two
of my uncles first went to live in Buenos Aires before they arrived in the
US in December, 1911. However, the rest of the family came directly >from
Romania in January, 1921.

Perhaps it was easier or less expensive to go that route. Baron Hirsch's
Jewish Colonization Association had established several settlements in
Argentina by then. According to the Wikipedia article, "between 1906 and
1912, some 13,000 Jews immigrated to Argentina every year"
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_of_Argentina).

-David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York
KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER: Odessa, Ukraine > New York
SHERMAN: Russia/Romania > New York > Los Angeles
WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


David Oseas <doseas{nospam}@...>
 

I wrote:

I'm not aware of any quotas in existence before the Immigration Act of
1924 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_immigration_legislation)
Correction: Emergency Quota Act of 1921

David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York
KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER: Odessa, Ukraine > New York
SHERMAN: Russia/Romania > New York > Los Angeles
WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


Barry Lachman
 

The first act establishing quotas was 1917. As stated in David's email
there may have been other reasons. One of my grandfather's siblings
went to South Africa (all of his brothers and sisters were in Chester,
PA by 1908) in 1914. We do not know the reasons. Another group of
four cousins went >from Lithuania to Cuba then spread out to Miami,
Colombia, Mexico, and Honduras followed by Panama. According to one
family story they did not have funds for all four to go to Chester.
Another version says that they settled on their ultimate destinations
based on where there were business opportunities. A final version of
the story is that they got on the boat in 1924 thinking they were
going to Chester through New York and then were told that they were
not in the quota. What is not disputable was that the 1917 and 1924
laws were aimed at excluding Eastern European Jews, Italians, Greeks
and Asians since the stated purpose was to maintain the ethnic balance
present in 1890.

Barry Lachman
Dallas


A. E. Jordan
 

blachman@sbcglobal.net writes:
The first act establishing quotas was 1917. As stated in David's email
there may have been other reasons.

While the quotas were not really in effect till after World War I in the
United States, there had always been other issues of concern.

Anyone coming to the USA had to be in good health, had to have some form of
income or ability to get a job, had to have some US money when they were
arriving and had to be going to someone. For unaccompanied women they
needed to have some one to claim them.

The images of immigrants arriving in America wondering off the dock into
the strange new land are things of the movies, not reality in the 20th
century.

So if your family did not go to America it could have been for those
reasons even before the quota. Or maybe someone they knew went somewhere else
and wrote back and told them how wonderful it was in ..... or in the case of
my family it is said the patriarch split up his sons, sending one to
America, one to Australia, one to South Africa and maybe one to South America in
the hope/belief that at least one would survive to carry on the family. In
the end I have found the Australian, South African and American branches
and all thrived .... but at lass the one who went to South America was never
heard >from again.

Allan Jordan


Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Quotas were created after WWI, as part of the anti-immigration response of
that period.

Before WWI, and specifically in 1912, the only restrictions on entry to the
US were health issues, and conditions that made a person "likely to become a
public charge." These would have been things like a physical deformity
where no other family members were likely to be able to support them, mental
defects, blindness, etc. I believe a certain minimal amount of money was
required to be in the possession of the immigrating family as a whole (or
the head of the family). That was around $6.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY
PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com