Relatives in manifests #general


David Schreiber
 

I have recently found that my maternal grandfather and his brother each cited a much
older sister (about 15 years) in Boston who they were going to see on their ship m
anifests. Since I had never heard about this sister, I would like to know, before
I go too far down that road, if an immigrant of that time would be likely to call
someone a sister who may not have been one.

David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL
Researching: KAYLO, HOOKAYLO, HOKAILO, HOKAILS in New York, Newark, Boston, El
Paso; GORDON in Boston


Joseph Hirschfield
 

If someone wanted to emigrate to the US it was considered much easier for
processing if the immigrant claimed to have a close relative. It was insurance
against the possibility of being denied entry. The same thing shows on the
manifest for my grandfather and his sister and their father who all arrived
together. They respectively cited an unnamed sister and daughter. This really
confused me because I could find no evidence that there was a close relative
already in the US.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
HIRSCHFELD, HIRSZFELD, LINDENBAUM, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM- Skwarzawa (Skvaryava),
Sielec Bienkow (Selets), Glinyany, Jaryczow Nowy (Novyy Yarychiv)-GALICIA
MINOFF, MINOWICKI, MINOWITZKI, TOBIASZ-Brest Litovsk, Wysokae Litovsk-BELARUS

dbschreiber@... writes:
I have recently found that my maternal grandfather and his brother each cited a
much older sister (about 15 years) in Boston who they were going to see on their
ship manifests...if an immigrant of that time would be likely to call someone a
sister who may not have been one.


Bev Potter <basha@...>
 

I wouldn't assume that she wasn't a "true" older sister just because it might have
been easier to emigrate if the immigrant claimed to have a close relative. Don't
rush to write someone off on that basis - you won't know if she is a sibling until
you trace through the birth records.

My great-grandfather Nathan Paderefsky is listed in the 1900 New York census with
his wife and children and, along with them is Jacob, a brother. Nathan in 1900 was
38 years old, Jacob is listed as 20 years old - a difference of 18 years!

Is Jacob a full brother, a half-brother or perhaps no "true" brother at all? I
don't know yet. But, if he is a full brother or even a half-brother, suddenly my
tree just got a lot larger.

Bev Potter
Colorado

David Schreiber wrote:
I have recently found that my maternal grandfather and his brother each cited a
much older sister (about 15 years) in Boston who they were going to see on their
ship manifests. Since I had never heard about this sister, I would like to know,
before I go too far down that road, if an immigrant of that time would be likely
to call someone a sister who may not have been one.


Martin Miller
 

For whatever it's worth, I can cite a couple of examples.

My grandfather was traveling to an "uncle" in Brooklyn in 1911. Since I knew almost
nothing about my grandfather's family I spent years tracking down the family of the
"uncle." I was able to learn that the "uncle" came >from the same town (Virbalis,
Lithuania), but I can't figure out any way they could have been related.

My wife's relative came with his future wife and a child as a family of three,
using her family name! By age and first name, I'm guessing that the child was the
future wife's first cousin. One surname instead of three.

Another relative has a cousin listed on the manifest as her oldest child, but the
ages were way too close for the cited relationship to be believed. However, even
though the relationships weren't what one might have thought at first glance, there
was actually a lot of information to be had.

Martin Miller
Syracuse, NY
millerm214@...
http://home.roadrunner.com/~themillers/ for my genealogy site

From: Bev Potter [mailto:basha@...]
I wouldn't assume that she wasn't a "true" older sister just because it might
have been easier to emigrate if the immigrant claimed to have a close relative.

David Schreiber wrote:
I have recently found that my maternal grandfather and his brother each cited a
much older sister (about 15 years) in Boston who they were going to see on
their ship manifests. Since I had never heard about this sister, I would like
to know, before I go too far down that road, if an immigrant of that time would
be likely to call someone a sister who may not have been one.


A. E. Jordan
 

Snillop47@... writes:
Nathan in 1900 was 38 years old, Jacob is listed as 20 years old - a difference
of 18 years! .... That is not an extraordinary.gap.

Agreed I think a lot of our trees show families with large age differences between
the youngest and oldest children. My ggm had 5 children, 2 that died and then 3
more. The best I can tell there is between an 18 and 20 year span so much so that
the younger three were referred to as the "second family." Years later when they
were living in the USA its gets more interesting because the oldest son's children
live with the grandparents. So the Census shows the parents, their children from
the "second family" and then two years younger than the youngest child a grandson.
Uncle and nephew were just two years apart in age.

Allan Jordan


Snillop47@...
 

basha@... writes:
My great-grandfather Nathan Paderefsky is listed in the 1900 New York census with
his wife and children and, along with them is Jacob, a brother. Nathan in 1900
was 38 years old, Jacob is listed as 20 years old - a difference of 18 years!

That is not an extraordinary.gap. My paternal grandparents had 9 children, all of
whom survived. The oldest was born in 1883/4 in what is now Belarus. The youngest
was born in 1905 in London, at least 21 years between them.

Harold Pollins
Oxford, England


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Once again I have to add "It depends when you immigrated and your sex." Before
quotas, any male could come to the US, provided he was healthy and had the required
money ($10 at one point) or somebody who would support him until he could get a
job. You didn't need a close relative if you had the money or had a distant
relative or friend. Most everybody came to somebody they knew, it was just easier
to get acclimated.

Before quotas, females needed a husband or close family member (if a woman came
steerage - if you had money for a cabin you were assumed to be able to live off
your 'wealth' like Mrs. Astor). Women were not allowed in without somebody to
support them because they were assumed not to be able to get an 'honest' job.

But in the big immigration years, you didn't need to have close family who had
already immigrated.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ