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Obituary wording: What does "B'Red" mean? #general


Sharon Zane <sharonzane@...>
 

In the obituary of a cousin of my mother, published in Alberta, CA, it says:
"Michael was one of three brothers born to Moshe B'Red Asher Zehleg and Rebecca."
What does "B'Red" stand for? I had thought that Michael was the son of Moshe, and
the grandson of Asher Zehleg, and I wonder whether this term "B'Red" confirms that?

Complicating this is the inscription on Michael's tombstone, which in Hebrew, I am
told by two Israeli friends, reads "Michael, son of Asher Zelig."

Thank you in advance!

Sharon Zane
New York City

Researching: ROJCHMAN, Wyshgorodok, Ukraine LINOV, Yevpatoria, Crimea ZEGELBAUM,
Pulawy, Poland HERBST, Pulawy (and maybe Radom), Poland WAJNSTZOK, Pulawy or
environs, Poland SZTOKBAUM, Wawolnica, Poland, and Pulawy, Poland ZACHAREK, Nowe
Miasto and Plonsk, Poland FELMAN, Plonsk, Poland


yehuda frischman
 

Sharon Zane wrote:
In the obituary of a cousin of my mother, published in Alberta, CA, it says:
"Michael was one of three brothers born to Moshe B'Red Asher Zehleg and Rebecca."
What does "B'Red" stand for? =A0I had thought that Michael was the son of Moshe,
and the grandson of Asher Zehleg
Hi Sharon,

I believe that the "d" should be instead read as a "b", and instead should read,
" Moshe B'Reb Asher Zehleg and Rebecca." That is an abbreviated form of writing,
Moshe the son of the esteemed Asher Zehleg....

All the best,

Yehuda Frischman


Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Sharon Zane asked about the name of her relative, which was stated in an obituary
as 'Michael was one of three brothers born to Moshe B'Red Asher Zehleg and
Rebecca.' The obituary does indeed state that Michael was the son of Moshe, and
it's likely that B'Red was an error that should have read B'Reb, which is short
for ben Reb and means 'son of Mr.' There have been many messages about the word
Reb that can be reviewed by searching the Discussion Group Archives, but it's a
nearly meaningless honorific that can be applied to any married man, and it doesn't
mean Rabbi.

Especially if the obituary was in a non-Jewish newspaper, it's pretty easy to
imaginge how ben Reb could have been changed to B'Red, even if it was spelled out
on the phone. The complication of the inscription on Michael's tombstone in
Hebrew, which reads 'Michael, son of Asher Zelig,' is a problem. Just because it's
written in stone, doesn't mean it's correct. If the stone is relatively recent and
it's still possible to determine who arranged for the stone by calling the monument
maker - for instance, was it an adult child, or an indirect relative who may not
have been sure of his name, or did/do his adult children not know his Hebrew name?
Finding out who placed the obituary, unless it's recent, is usually more difficult,
but it seems like the stone and the obituary were done by two different people.

The most reliable documentation is to get his birth certificate or registration, if
that's possible.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.