Supposed death on board ship coming to NY #general


Rochelle Kaplan <ro@...>
 

A ship manifest >from 1905 shows a Philip Weinberg, 6 months, arriving
with his mother Yetty/Jetty. The person whom I am helping with his
genealogy insists >from family lore that the baby died on board the ship.
How would I determine if Philip died on board, and if yes, how would I
determine cause of death and disposition of body? Would I have to go to
film with ship manifest and go to the end of the roll for that ship
(Noordam) and day of arrival (May 23)?

Thx.

Rochelle Kaplan
Salt Lake City, UT


A. E. Jordan
 

ro@... writes:
A ship manifest >from 1905 shows a Philip Weinberg, 6 months, arriving
with his mother Yetty/Jetty. The person whom I am helping with his
genealogy insists >from family lore that the baby died on board the ship.
How would I determine if Philip died on board, and if yes, how would I
determine cause of death and disposition of body? Would I have to go to
film with ship manifest and go to the end of the roll for that ship
(Noordam) and day of arrival (May 23)?


I have seen deaths indicted on a ship's manifest. I am afraid you are
going to have to look through the manifest though to see if it is there. I
would look at the actual line where the person is listed and see if there are
any notes or cross outs, ie a line through the name. I would also check
the end of that section if the passenger list is in sections and then I would
check the last few pages. But you might end up going page by page to be
sure.

You can do this online but it will be slow depending on your computer or
else you could go look at the microfilm which could be a little quicker.

I am sure if a person died on the ship the ship reported it on arrival to
NYC .... assuming the ship knew the person had died. The health
authorities would have been very concerned over the cause of death.

As for a death certificate no one has ever proved as best I know that the
states issued death certificates for someone who died on a ship. (I have
seen a grave for someone in a NYC cemetery and the family tells me the man
died on the ship and the wife had to wait on Ellis Island for the son to come
claim them.) But we did not find a death certificate.

I would suggest trying to look in the NYC on line death index --- just in
case --- but also you might need to figure out if the ship docked in New
York or New Jersey. A lot of the ships of this era docked in Hoboken,
so the death certificate might possibly be in New Jersey.

One final long shot might be checking the online edition of the NY Times
which is fully digital and search more the ship's name and the date. Its
possible that there was a mention of a death on a ship in the paper .... again
people were very concerned about the health issues.

Good luck with your searching.

Allan Jordan


Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Rochelle Kaplan wrote
A ship manifest >from 1905 shows a Philip Weinberg, 6 months, arriving
with his mother Yetty/Jetty.
Looking at the manifest itself and seing the endorsment of [probably the US
authorities, them havonmg together 7 dollars on them and going to the
husband that already lives at 1685 Lexington Ave.,
I would say the boy was alive and possibly well on arrival.

<http://tinyurl.com/yee27ma> line 12 an 13

They came >from Grodno, and the mother had [last] been in NY in May 1899,
which suggests some wealth, ccntradicting the only 7 dollars.

So most probably the husband/father had been in Grodno 6 + 9 = 15 months
before their arrival.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Rochelle Kaplan asked about finding out whether Philip Weinberg, a baby
who was about 6 months old, died en route to America aboard the
Noordam, which arrived at Ellis Island on May 23, 1905.

Death at sea can be a complicated issue. Of course Rochelle should
carefully check the ship manifest for additional information, including
the first and last pages. However, that might have only a simple
notation like "died at sea."

"Pronouncements" of deaths at sea are usually made by a doctor at
the ship's next port of call, so the N.Y.C. death vital records should
be checked for a death certificate. Keep in mind that there's a chance
that the ship may have stopped in Boston or elsewhere before New York -
these should be at one end of the manifest pages but the only difference
in these pages may be the name of the port written at the top.

Saul Issroff pointed out yesterday that if the ship was a British vessel,
a report made back across the Atlantic to English authorities as well.
I believe that at least for some of the time, this applied only to English
citizens, and not to citizens of other countries who were passing through
England on their way to America, even if they stayed in England for a
while.

There are also some previous messages about this subject in the
Discussion Group's archives.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.