Given name 'Paul': Lithuania - South Africa #general


Adrian Freedman
 

Dear colleagues:

a great uncle living in South Africa was known as Paul
He came >from Lithuania

Please may I have suggestions as to what his name would have been
in Lithuania

He was said to have come >from "Wekvirsan" Please suggestions as to
correct place name. Could it be Vieksniai?

Appreciate all help

Best wishes

Adrian Freedman


Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

(Adrian Freedman) writes:
a great uncle living in South Africa was known as Paul
He came >from Lithuania. Please may I have suggestions as to
what his name would have been in Lithuania

It could have been almost anything. There is no direct Hebrew or Yiddish
equivalent. People sometimes kept the initial sound of their Hebrew/Yiddish
names when choosing an "English" name, so maybe Peretz or Pesach or Pinchas.

Robert Israel
israel@...
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Jules Levin
 

Adrian Freedman writes:
a great uncle living in South Africa was known as Paul
He came >from Lithuania. Please may I have suggestions as to
what his name would have been in Lithuania

Curiously, this name unlike most, does have a Hebrew equivalent known to
many Gentiles --Saul, since the apostle Paul is introduced to us in the
NT with his Hebrew name--Sha'ul.
Thus it might be possible that a Gentile immigration officer or a
NT-literate neighbor could have suggested the name Paul upon hearing the
name Saul.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


boris
 

To address Adrian Freedman's initial request for suggestions what might be a
Lithuanian Jewish version of Paul, the answer, if exists, is in South
Africa. The man changed his name while there. There must be there a
tombstone with his Hebrew name or a record of his synagogue membership or a
donation. He might have attended English classes, worked in a sweatshop,
registered his children's birth, was identified on pictures in the hands of
relatives and friends, and so on.

Jumping to research in the "old country" may prove beneficial only when the
surname is relatively rare and the "shtetl of origin" is small, e.g. 20-50
families. Finding a birth record of, say, Pinchas-Leib Goldstein in Kovno
may make one feel victorious - until three pages later he finds a birth
records of one Moishe-Pinchas Goldstein.

Most people did leave sufficient paper trail in the US, UK, SA, and other
countries. That's where I would start.

Boris Feldblyum
Potomac, MD