Tavern keepers #general


Paulette Bronstein
 

Greetings and Happy New Year!

I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania). Why were there so many taverns?
Was alcohol served? Were these restaurants? Who had money to go to such places?
Did our Jewish ancestors frequent these taverns?

Paulette Bronstein
Aventura, Fl

GAMBURG -Salakas (Lithuania), Ekaterinoslav (Ukraine), Brooklyn (NY,USA), Argentina
GAMUS - Disna (Belarus), Brooklyn (NY, USA) PITEL - Salakas (Lithuania) LEVIN -
Salakas (Lithuania) SHAPIR - Salakas (Lithuania) BRONSHTEIN - Ostrug (Ukraine),
Hadera and Kfar Saba (Israel) ROSENSCWEIG - Lodz (Poland), Hadera and Kfar Saba
(Israel)

MODERATOR NOTE: There has been some discussion over the years about taverns and
distilleries. Please look at the JewishGen Discussion Group archives for some of
those discussions


Snillop47@...
 

paulettebron@aol.com writes:
I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania). Why were there so many taverns?
Was alcohol served? Were these restaurants? Who had money to go to such places?
Did our Jewish ancestors frequent these taverns?

There is a good short account in "The Jewish Tavern-Keeper and his Tavern in
Nineteenth-Century Polish Literature," by Magdalena Opalski
Harold Pollins
Oxford, England


Joseph Hirschfield
 

What you see as "taverns" were likely what we would call "inns." The towns and
villages didn't have hotels, but inns served to house travelers overnight. The
roads were dangerous after dark and travelers were taken by the wagon drivers to
inns which took care of the horses' needs as well as providing rest and food for
the passengers. Of course liquor was available. Since Christians were not allowed
by their church to engage in alcohol products trade, the liquor business was
pretty much a Jewish monopoly.

Joseph Hirschfield
Portage, MI USA
HIRSZFELD, HIRSCHFELD, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM, LINDENBAUM-Skwarzawa, Sielec
Bienkow, Gliniany, Jaryczow Nowy-GALICIA
MINOFF, MINOWICKI, MINOWITZKI-Brest Litovsk, Wysokae Litovsk-BELARUS

paulettebron@aol.com writes:
I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania).


tbartman <bartmant@...>
 

In the Polish Lithuanian commonwealth of the 16th and 17th Century and earlier the
rural towns were run by magnates or nobility who welcomed Jews in believing that
they would be useful in terms of economic development and administration. Jews at
that time were largely involved in the marketing and transport of grain to the
West, the collection of fees or taxes, and the production and sale of alcohol and
"tavern keeping". The Jewish tavern keeper (often the Taverns and breweriers were
leased by Jews) became a fixture of the rural landscape. It was primarily but not
by any means exclusively non Jewish peasants who were served, and not infrequently
they would drink themselves into dept to the Jewish tavern keeper. Some of these
places were really lively colorful places to put it somewhat mildly. Sometimes they
were the venue of fights between non Jewish and Jewish "Toughs", particularly on
Mondays. The Christian peasants would come into town to attend church on Sunday and
then frequent the Tavern on Monday. I wouldn't call these places restaurants. So,
tavern keeping became one of the "traditional" Jewish occupations, and in many
locations in the 16th or 17th century more than 50 percent of the Jewish men might
be involved in the production or sale of alcohol. I could go on and on about this
explaining all the changes that occurred later, but hope this gives you some answer
to your question.

Tilford Bartman

paulettebron@aol.com wrote:

I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many
"tavern keepers" listed in the revision lists.


Pamela Weisberger
 

paulettebron@aol.com writes:
"I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many "tavern
keepers" listed in the revision lists. I found many "tavern keepers" in my
grandfather's birth place (Salakas, Lithuania)."

An excellent, illustrated entry >from the Yivo Encylopedia on this topic is
available here: http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Tavernkeeping

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Jules Levin
 

... Since Christians were not allowed
by their church to engage in alcohol products trade, the liquor business was
pretty much a Jewish monopoly.
On the production of alcohol in Poland and Russia, google the history of
distilleries in Tsarist Russia. It is clear that there was never a church
prohibition on producing alcohol. In some cases the church was eager to get in on
the profits. In Moscow the distilleries were a government monopoly. In Poland the
nobility monopolized the production, but gradually they brought in Jews to manage
the trade, and the taverns, because the profits for the nobility were better and
steadier with Jews running the enterprises. There was a prejudice against middle-
man economic activity in Russian culture, but I doubt there was a single general
economic activity that Jews engaged in where there were no Russian competitors.
Is it really conceivable that over the vast stretches of Eastern Europe and the
Russian Empire in places where there were few or no Jews, that a Russian landowner,
soldier, or peasant, could not buy vodka?
Jules Levin
Los Angeles

MODERATOR NOTE: Please continue the discussion of the regulation of taverns and
the alcohol trade in the Russian Empire privately, unless your comments are
directly relevant to genealogy.


Paul Silverstone
 

I recommend a wonderful Polish film called "Austeria" made in 1982.
Director Jerzy Kawalerowicz, it is about a Jewish inn on the
Austrian-Russian border on the first day of World War I.
The video blurb says,
"On the first day of World War I, a group of Jews flee >from the Cossack
army in Polish Galicia and finds itself trapped overnight in a border
inn. Relationships develop, love affairs are snatched, the religious pray."
The groups include a band of actors, students >from a Yeshiva with rebbe,
and other individuals, all Jews.

Paul Silverstone

On 1/4/2012 8:03 AM, paulettebron@aol.com wrote:

I would appreciate any comments about the fact that there were so many
"tavern keepers" listed in the revision lists.
MODERATOR NOTE: Please continue the discussion about tavern keepers
privately, as it is outside the scope of this group.