What would the name "GOLD" be likely to be in Russia (Belarus) in the late 1800s? #general


Martha Forsyth
 

I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the
US and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself
wondering if searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is
likely to be the original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have
been used then around Gomel) form of the name? I'm having the devil of
a time with this family, maybe one day I'll get it all together and ask
for some other eyes to look at it - for the moment I'm giving them a
rest while I try other things.

Martha Schecter Forsyth
Newton, MA


Meron Lavie
 

"Gold" in Russian is "zolata". I don't recall ever hearing it as a surname.

Meron Lavie

-----Original Message-----
From: Dick & Martha Forsyth [mailto:theforsyths@...]
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2012 8:50 AM

I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the US
and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself wondering if
searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is likely to be the
original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have been used then around
Gomel) form of the name?


Sue Clamp <clamp@...>
 

I have some Golds that were originally Goldstein.

Sue Clamp
Cambridgeshire, UK

On 26/03/2012 07:49, Dick & Martha Forsyth wrote:
I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the
US and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself wondering
if searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is likely to be
the original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have been used then
around Gomel) form of the name?


Meron Lavie
 

I was corrected off-line, and wish to pass on the correction: The Russian
word for gold is "Zoloto" and not "zolata". I hear more Russian than I read,
and many Russians pronounce the written "o" as a soft "ah" sort of sound.

Meron LAVIE

Researching:
LESSEL (East Prussia)
MAHLER (Odessa)
SOLOMON (Romania)
BREINER (Buchach)
MILLER (Buchach)
BINDER/BODNER (Buchach)


Percy Mett
 

Martha Schecter Forsyth wrote:

I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the
US and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself
wondering if searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is
likely to be the original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have
been used then around Gomel) form of the name?
GOLD is the same in Yiddish, and there were many GOLDs in Eastern Europe.

In addition you could try names beginning ZLOTO- (Zlata being Slavic for gold).

Perets Mett
London


Roger Lustig
 

This is where the JewishGen Family Finder comes in so handy. I find
over 50 entries for names beginning with ZOLOT-, a dozen or so ZLOTs, a
ZOLATNITSKY, and more-->from Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, etc.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

From: Dick& Martha Forsyth [mailto:theforsyths@...]
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2012 8:50 AM

I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the US
and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself wondering if
searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is likely to be the
original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have been used then around
Gomel) form of the name?


tom
 

I don't think there's a single direct answer to this question.

But if they landed in the late 1800s, you might be able to find their
records at Ellis Island, at least. A wildcard search for names
containing "gold" shouldn't turn up more than a few hundred hits. :-)

....... tom klein, toronto

Dick & Martha Forsyth <theforsyths@...> wrote:

I'm trying to sort out a family or two of GOLDs - that name used in the
US and in England. But further back than that?? I find myself
wondering if searching for the surname "GOLD" is appropriate. What is
likely to be the original (Russian/Yiddish/Hebrew/whatever would have
been used then around Gomel) form of the name?


Steven Bloom
 

Lets not ignore the obvious. "GOLD" itself would have been a
perfectly acceptable name in Belarus in that time period, as would
GOLD- with all of the common suffixies (-SZTAJN (Stein), -BERG, etc).

The same would have been true for SZYLBER (Silver).

These are essentially Yiddish derived surnames.

However, each had relatively common counterparts in Polsh at least
(not sure about Russian). For instance, the names ZLOTY and ZLOTNIK were
common in Poland, as was SREBNIK (Silver coin) and also a number of
names related to copper.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia, USA

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