Ship manifests for Outbound US Passengers #general


David Laskin
 

I have been trying to find out when a relative (who held a Polish
passport) left the US for Palestine in the 1940s. Thanks to the great
suggestion of a Genner, I just received much fascinating information
from the US Citizenship and Immigration Services, including his
"application for reentry permit." On this form it says he intended to
depart on board the ship "Marine Carp" for Egypt and Palestine on
December 15, 1946. Is there any way to ascertain whether he actually
did this sailing -- for example a manifest of outbound passengers?
His grandchildren in Israel think he came later, so I'm curious about
whether he actually made the voyage as stated on the reentry permit.
Thanks. David Laskin, Seattle, WA


Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

David Laskin wrote on 01 jul 2012 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

I have been trying to find out when a relative (who held a Polish
passport) left the US for Palestine in the 1940s.
...Is there any way to ascertain whether he actually
did this sailing -- for example a manifest of outbound passengers?...
The US did not even wanted to see departing passengers or their passports
prior to 9-11. So I doubt there was any registration.

The ship's manifests were probabliy only handed over to the local
authorities at the port of debarcation, nowadays called disembarcation.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 7/1/2012 9:20:02 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
exxjxw.hannivoort@inter.nl.net writes:
"The ship's manifests were probabliy only handed over to the local
authorities at the port of debarcation, nowadays called disembarcation."

If you are luck enough to have had an ancestor who sailed to the UK those
inbound record are at least in part of Ancestry in their International
Edition. I have been able to find my family making trips to Europe in the
1920s and 1950s in those records.

The shipping lines themselves kept copies of everything for obvious reasons
that they wanted to know who was on their ships. The problem is that a
lot of the shipping lines are out of business and the records are generally
not centralized or in many cases even saved. If you knew the specific ship
you could search to see if those records are saved. (For example the
Cunard White Star passenger records are at the University of Liverpool.)

Allan Jordan