Natan Nate #general


Dan <doren@...>
 

A recent ViewMate posting of a tombstone with the name of "Natan Nate"
(Hebrew letters nun-taf-nunsofit nun-tet-ayin) raises the question for me
of the name nun-tet-ayin.

Is this typically meant as a nickname "Nate", an alternative to the formal name
of Natan or Nathan.
Or is this properly meant as a second given name, "Nateh", perhaps?

This combination appears on a tombstone as well for a different relative in my
extended family.

Sincerely,
Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut, USA

Also searching: MAJZELS >from Lublin, Poland and CHUWENs and KALBERs >from Kozlow,
Tarnopol Province, Galicia


Arnold Davidson
 

Dan Oren wrote:
A recent ViewMate posting of a tombstone with the name of "Natan Nate"
(Hebrew letters nun-taf-nunsofit nun-tet-ayin) raises the question for me
of the name nun-tet-ayin.

Is this typically meant as a nickname "Nate", an alternative to the formal name
of Natan or Nathan.
Or is this properly meant as a second given name, "Nateh", perhaps?
The person in question was my great-grandfather. His name, as written in
his ketuba, was spelled differently than that shown in the Viewmate posting.
On his ketuba it was spelled nun-taf-nunsofit nun-aleph-tet-aleph. The name
written in Latin characters on his passenger manifest was Notel. It appears
that, rather than a nickname, Nata or Nota was used as a second given name.

Arnold Davidson
Boynton Beach


tom
 

I suspect the "real" explanation lies buried beneath layers of custom
and Hebrew versus Yiddish spelling rules, but the answer is "yes."

In English, the name "Nathan" is spelled with a "th" to represent the
softer sound of the taf, pronounced as "s" by the Ashkenazim (and "t"
by the Sefardim).

"Nate" wasn't pronounced nay-t, as it would pronounced in English, but
rather nah-teh or noh-teh. And as a Yiddish nickname, even though it is
clearly connected to Nathan, it is spelled using the rules of Yiddish
spelling, using a tet rather a taf (or actually, a saf), and an ayin to
represent the vowel "eh."

tom klein, Toronto

Dan <doren@optimum.net> wrote:
A recent ViewMate posting of a tombstone with the name of "Natan Nate"
(Hebrew letters nun-taf-nunsofit nun-tet-ayin) raises the question for me
of the name nun-tet-ayin.

Is this typically meant as a nickname "Nate", an alternative to the
formal name of Natan or Nathan.
Or is this properly meant as a second given name, "Nateh", perhaps?


Dan <doren@...>
 

Dear JewishGenners:
I have received a number of very helpful replies to my post and have
replied individually.

I would like particularly to thank Eden Joachim and David Crook who, with
the help of the JewishGen and LitvakSIG Given Names Database, led me to
understand this family member (whose English name was Nathan) likely had
the Yiddish name of "Noteh or Nuta", reflected as stated below on the
tombstone. Both correspond with an English language nickname of Nate.
My thanks to all my colleagues in family history.
Sincerely,
Dan Oren

Dan Oren <doren@optimum.net> wrote:

A recent ViewMate posting of a tombstone with the name of "Natan Nate"
(Hebrew letters nun-taf-nunsofit nun-tet-ayin) raises the question for me
of the name nun-tet-ayin.

Is this typically meant as a nickname "Nate", an alternative to the formal name
of Natan or Nathan.
Or is this properly meant as a second given name, "Nateh", perhaps?

This combination appears on a tombstone as well for a different relative in my
extended family.