1870 US Federal Census - Manhattan #general


Meron Lavie
 

Hi All,

I understand that there are some peculiarities with the 1870 Census for
Manhattan.

First of all, I believe it was performed twice, as the first attempt was
deemed unsatisfactory.

Second, it appears to me that street numbers were not listed. Is that
possible? Am I missing something? Does this essentially mean that I have to
go through reams of records online to manually cover, let's say Fifth Ave.,
even if I know the exact address?

TIA for any guidance,

Meron LAVIE
Israel


Joel Weintraub
 

The 1870 census was so poorly done, that a second enumeration was done for
NYC (Manhattan and West Bronx), Philadelphia, and Indianapolis. The second
enumeration for NYC contained addresses.

I'm trying, so far without success, to get the New York Public Library to
digitize their ED map of the second enumeration that presumably is at:
"table 7 in room 121" of the main library. The source for this information
is:
http://www.nypl.org/sites/default/files/blog_attachments/searching-the-census_2.pdf
[Mod. Note: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/G4zjh ]

I sent an inquiry to them in early December, and just sent another followup.

If I had that map, I would transcribe the streets within EDs, and we would
put it up on the Morse One-Step site.

If any Genner is visiting the NY Public Library and can photograph in high
resolution (overlapping images) that map and send it to me, that would be
much appreciated, especially if my inquiries for such digitial images aren't
answered by the library.

Joel

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
https://sites.google.com/site/census1940/

Meron Lavie <lavie@...> wrote:
I understand that there are some peculiarities with the 1870 Census for
Manhattan.

First of all, I believe it was performed twice, as the first attempt was
deemed unsatisfactory.

Second, it appears to me that street numbers were not listed. Is that
possible? Am I missing something? Does this essentially mean that I have to
go through reams of records online to manually cover, let's say Fifth Ave.,
even if I know the exact address?
MODERATOR NOTE: Due to correspondence backlogs, it is not unusual for
large institutions to take several weeks, if not months, to get back to us
with responses to inquiries. Joel has provided a good suggestion for a
work-around for those of us anxious to continue our research.


Joel Weintraub
 

First, I want to thank Alan Steinfeld who went to the main branch of the NY
Public Library, and hand photographed the map the library has for figuring
out the Wards and Election Districts needed for the second enumeration of
the 1870 census for Manhattan ("New York City").

I then decided I needed a good 1870 street map of the city, and starting
searching for it, and surprise of surprises, found the same map online, and
in great resolution. It's dated November 1870.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f7/1870_Hardy_Map_of_Manhattan%2C_New_York_City_-_Geographicus_-_PoliticalDivisions-hardy-1870.jpg
or http://tinyurl.com/bmqokp3

from what I can figure out, the main (bottom) map is the one we want. On
that map, the large red numbers appear to be the Ward numbers, and each
Election District (comprising a number of blocks) has it's own color and
shows a single small black number within one of the blocks of that Election
District.

I wonder how long this map has been in public view but the significance not
understood.

Joel

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA

https://sites.google.com/site/census1940/