Patronymic "Idevna"? #general


Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

David Ellis wrote:

My father in law's birth certificate, >from 1918 in what is now Ukraine, was
handwritten in Russian. His mother's name was shown as Toyba Idevna. I
would presume that "Idevna" is a patronymic form giving her father's name.
But what kind of first name is "Id"? It sounds more Freudian than Jewish.
from the name Idl (Ydl) like in "Idl met a fiddle".
My uncle name was Idl, and my cousins were identify by their patronym
as "Idovich", not Idlovich.
Same goes with the female.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Jules Levin
 

On 4/20/2013 11:53 AM, David Ellis wrote:
My father in law's birth certificate, >from 1918 in what is now Ukraine, was
handwritten in Russian. His mother's name was shown as Toyba Idevna. I
would presume that "Idevna" is a patronymic form giving her father's name.
But what kind of first name is "Id"? It sounds more Freudian than Jewish.
My guess is Yehudah, which goes to yida, and in some dialects yi- and i-
merge, giving id-. This change even occurs in English; there are
dialects where east and yeast are pronounced the same.

Jules Levin
(retired linguist)


David Ellis
 

My father in law's birth certificate, >from 1918 in what is now Ukraine, was
handwritten in Russian. His mother's name was shown as Toyba Idevna. I
would presume that "Idevna" is a patronymic form giving her father's name.
But what kind of first name is "Id"? It sounds more Freudian than Jewish.

David J Ellis
Natick, MA
djemkitso@...