Fish suppers #general


Alexander Sharon
 

Henry Tobias

My maternal line was Lithuanian and my paternal line was Polish. Both
my parents were born in London, England. I remember as a young child
that we had fish for Friday night supper, but in later years my mother
made chicken. Does anyone else have a similar memory and does anyone
know if this was a tradition in one of these two cultures? Thanks
Henry,

This is a long standing Roman Catholic tradition of Friday Fast.

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Henry Tobias <alison@...>
 

Dear Jewishgen,
My maternal line was Lithuanian and my paternal line was Polish. Both
my parents were born in London, England. I remember as a young child
that we had fish for Friday night supper, but in later years my mother
made chicken. Does anyone else have a similar memory and does anyone
know if this was a tradition in one of these two cultures? Thanks

Henry Tobias


Sherri Bobish
 

Alexander wrote:
"This is a long standing Roman Catholic tradition of Friday Fast."

Actually, the tradition was not eating meat on Fridays, not fasting. There's
an interesting NPR article on the subject:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/04/05/150061991/lust-lies-and-empire-the-fishy-tale-behind-eating-fish-on-friday
[MODERATOR NOTE: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/ahL1YM ]

As a child in Brooklyn in the 1950's I recall the "fish man" coming around in
his truck every Friday & selling fish to all the housewives.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Roberta Sheps
 

Further to Alexander's email about the Roman Catholic tradition of eating
fish on Fridays, it's also helpful to remember that for many years Jews
shared London's East End with members of many nationalities, including the
Irish, who also were predominantly RC. Indeed, the divine Claudia Rodin
attributes the invention of fish and chips to the combination of the Jewish
tradition of frying fish in batter and the Irish heavy consumption of potatoes.

Roberta Sheps, Colchester, England

On 13 Jul 2014, at 08:20, Henry Tobia <henrytobias2646@...> wrote:
My maternal line was Lithuanian and my paternal line was Polish. Both
my parents were born in London, England. I remember as a young child
that we had fish for Friday night supper, but in later years my mother
made chicken. Does anyone else have a similar memory and does anyone
know if this was a tradition in one of these two cultures? Thanks


Anita Goldhill
 

Fish in England was cheap food, chicken was more expensive now it is the other
way around.

The Sephardic Jews would eat cold fried fish as a Shabbat meal which the
Ashkenazim adopted. I do not think the Catholic tradition of eating fish on a
Friday had any thing to do with Eastern European Jews.

Polish Jews and other Jews >from Eastern and Central Europe specialised in
Gefilte Fish using slight variations on the recipe depending on where they came
from. This dish was usually made >from fresh water fish which was chopped or
minced and used to stuff the skin of a carp. Once settled in Britain they also
began to fry minced fish balls. Today we mainly use sea fish.

For some Jews fish solves the problem with Kashrut (keeping kosher) by just
having one set of cutlery & dishes and being able to have milk such as in tea
and coffee straight after a meal.

kind regards

Anita Benson
London UK

Henry Tobias wrote:

My maternal line was Lithuanian and my paternal line was Polish. Both
my parents were born in London, England. I remember as a young child
that we had fish for Friday night supper, but in later years my mother
made chicken. Does anyone else have a similar memory and does anyone
know if this was a tradition in one of these two cultures? Thanks
Alexander Sharon wrote:

This is a long standing Roman Catholic tradition of Friday Fast.


Marilyn Hyman <marilynh@...>
 

Re Henry Tobias' question about the origin of fish suppers on Fridays in
British Jewish homes

Fish only for the Friday night meal was very common in Britain where the
ancestry was Polish. My late mother (some of whose Polish ancestors arrived
in England in the 1830s and the last of them 40 years later) suggested the
influence of no meat on Fridays amongst Catholic Poles. (See also "The Book
of Jewish Food" by Claudia Roden, who points to the fish dishes which were
adopted by many British Jews and were themselves a legacy >from the
Portuguese Marranos who settled there in the sixteenth century).

To this day my British family eat fish on Friday night, never chicken which
was reserved for lunch on the following day.

Marilyn Hyman
Researching: JACKSON (Sunderland and Margonin); HAWKINYOFF/OKUN
(Odessa);FLUGEL (Veliuona);NEWMAN (Leeds/Poland); VOYCHEROSKI
(Leeds/Poland); POSENER/COHEN(Kolo/London)


Doug Burrows
 

Another aspect concerning the consumption of fish is that at all times in
days long gone, fish was plentiful and a staple diet, especially around
Jerusalem.

Cheers
Doug Burrows

On 14 Jul 2014, at 4:26 pm, Anita Benson anitagoldhill@... wrote:
Fish in England was cheap food, chicken was more expensive now it is the other
way around.

The Sephardic Jews would eat cold fried fish as a Shabbat meal which the
Ashkenazim adopted. I do not think the Catholic tradition of eating fish on a
Friday had any thing to do with Eastern European Jews.

Polish Jews and other Jews >from Eastern and Central Europe specialised in
Gefilte Fish using slight variations on the recipe depending on where they came
from. This dish was usually made >from fresh water fish which was chopped or
minced and used to stuff the skin of a carp. Once settled in Britain they also
began to fry minced fish balls. Today we mainly use sea fish.

For some Jews fish solves the problem with Kashrut (keeping kosher) by just
having one set of cutlery & dishes and being able to have milk such as in tea
and coffee straight after a meal.

Henry Tobias wrote:

My maternal line was Lithuanian and my paternal line was Polish. Both
my parents were born in London, England. I remember as a young child
that we had fish for Friday night supper, but in later years my mother
made chicken. Does anyone else have a similar memory and does anyone
know if this was a tradition in one of these two cultures? Thanks
Alexander Sharon wrote:

This is a long standing Roman Catholic tradition of Friday Fast.


Ann Rabinowitz
 

Some time ago, I read that the American President, Thomas Jefferson, prior to
his Presidency in 1801, noted in a letter that whilst in London
(March 12-April 26, 1786), "he ate fish in the Jewish fashion". Further, one
could see a haze of frying oil overlaying London. It was probably caused by
the Jewish residents, mostly Spanish and Portuguese Jews, who following the
Inquisition, brought their culinary skill with frying fish to Great Britain
and which later translated into a nationally beloved British dish.

In addition, when Jefferson returned to his beloved home of Montecello in
Virginia, he took with him the Jewish recipe for fried fish.

One can also read more about the fish traditions of various Jews in an article
by Claudia Rodin: http://www.jhom.com/topics/fish/gefilte.html

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...


Martin Davis <dawidowicz@...>
 

Henry Tobias wrote: "...I remember as a young child that we had fish for Friday
night supper, but in later years my mother made chicken..."

I have come across a number of suggestions as to why Jews >from eastern
Europe eat fish on a Friday. The most interesting of which is the
association between fecundity and fish and the stated encouragement for
sexual relations on a Friday night! But it might as well be that fish (carp,
pike etc) was a relatively cheap source of protein which would nevertheless
have been a luxury for many Jewish families in Poland and Lithuania: so a
suitable way of celebrating shobbos without the need to take out a loan.

Unfortunately, all I can remember of my Polish family's Friday fish
preferences was that they made gefilte fish with added sugar; which
confirmed my Bessarabian grandmother's suspicions about her son-in-law and
his kin!

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Sheila Toffell
 

When I was a kid in London a cold fried fish or salmon / mackerel in egg and
lemon sauce meal was more usual in the summer (also, for some reason
vegetable soup rather than chicken soup, but still with the chicken after,
which I don't quite get). Fish was served more for Yomtov or if we had
guests the rest of the year.

I'm thinking it might have been more economy that anything else. There were
certain fish that were de rigueur in my recollection: plaice, chicken
halibut, salmon - and mackerel only for that one dish. This type of fish
became more expensive, making it more economical to go with the chicken,
which could go a lot further.

Sheila Toffell