Naming of child #general


Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

(Diana Helen Gomes da Costa Mohr dianadacosta@...) wrote:

I am mystified by the fact that my great-great grandmother chose to give
her sister's name to her daughter when her sister was still very much
alive! I always thought that generally speaking Ashkenazim named after
the deceased, not the living, and I was wondering whether anyone has any
ideas as to why one should name one's child after a very much alive sibling?
Probably both were named after a deceased grandmother or aunt.

I see that quit often.


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
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Visit the most beautiful shul of western Europe:
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Diana da Costa
 

Hello

I am mystified by the fact that my great-great grandmother chose to give her
sister's name to her daughter when her sister was still very much alive! I
always thought that generally speaking Ashkenazim named after the deceased,
not the living, and I was wondering whether anyone has any ideas as to why
one should name one's child after a very much alive sibling?

The facts are my great-great grandparents, Frances (nee DITTMANN) and Ludwig
HIRSCHMANN, married in February 1875 in New York. Both DITTMANN and
HIRSCHMANN families originated >from Bavaria. Their firstborn was a son but
their second was a daughter who they named Marie, my great-grandmother, who
was born in 1877. Frances, born in 1855, was the eldest of six children,
the youngest of whom was Marie, born in 1872 (and died in 1933) and so only
five years older than her niece.

All ideas gratefully received with many thanks!

Diana (MOHR) GOMES da COSTA, Kent UK - formerly >from London
Researcher number: 166938

Researches include ARNSTEIN, BACH, BASS, BERLIN, COHN, DITTMANN, FLACHFELD,
GUETERMANN, HAHN, HELLMANN, HIRSCHMANN, KOHN, KRAILSHEIMER, KUGLER, LOEWI,MANES,
MARX, MENDEL, MORGENTHAU, MOHR, ROSENWALD, UHLMANN, WEIKERSHEIMER and
ZIRNDORFER - all originally >from Bavaria

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A. E. Jordan
 

Sally M Bruckheimer wrote:
girl could have been named after an ancestor who was dead, possibly the
same ancestor that her aunt was named after.

Very likely situation. In my tree we had a matriarch named Brina and in her
grandchildren and beyond we find numerous girls named Beatrice all named for
the same woman. It got funny at cousin meetings or other times when a woman
would come up to you and say you do not know me but I am another Beatrice .....

Allan Jordan


Roger Lustig
 

Specifically, the tradition had to do with naming children after dead--and not
living--*ancestors.* Siblings, cousins, etc. were not considered. In the days of
large families, that was probably a good thing; otherwise we'd see more Rehoboams,
Melchisedechs, etc. in our family trees.

Also, it seems that the naming of daughters was not as strictly regulated as it
was for sons. Since the daughters were not circumcised nor likely to be called
to the Torah, their names were not taken as seriously as those of their male
siblings.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

(Diana Helen Gomes da Costa Mohr dianadacosta@...) wrote:
I am mystified by the fact that my great-great grandmother chose to give
her sister's name to her daughter when her sister was still very much alive!


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybr26@...>
 

Eastern European Ashkenazi do not name after living relatives,
although the girl could have been named after an ancestor who was
dead, possibly the same ancestor that her aunt was named after.

Western European Ashkenazi and all Sephardi did name after living
relatives, usually the first son after the father's father, the second
son after the mother's father, the first daughter after the father's
mother, the second daughter after the mother's mother.

And, of course, in the US, the less religious did what they wanted to do.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Aubrey Jacobus <aajacobus@...>
 

Ashkenazim also named sibling after a dead child
Aubrey Jacobus

London

"Sally Bruckheimer sallybr26@..." wrote:
Eastern European Ashkenazi do not name after living relatives,
although the girl could have been named after an ancestor who was
dead, possibly the same ancestor that her aunt was named after.