NYC newspapers #general


Mark Fearer
 

Howdy - I've searched the Jewishgen info files, and wasn't
able to find an answer, although it's likely been discussed
here before, so my apologies. My question is, when our non-famous
immigrant ancestors who lived in Manhattan died, were they likely to
have an obituary in any local publications, between 1890-1940?
The Forward? It seems unlikely they would appear in the NY Times. Where - if
anywhere - might there be an obituary?

TIA
Mark Fearer
Ancestral Discovery
www.ancestraldiscovery.com


A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Fearer surmonk@gmail.com

when our non-famous
immigrant ancestors who lived in Manhattan died, were they likely to
have an obituary in any local publications, between 1890-1940?
The Forward? It seems unlikely they would appear in the NY Times. Where - if
anywhere - might there be an obituary?


Not likely they had an obit at all unless they had achieved something
in the new country. The New York Times had paid death notices so maybe
possibly some of the family members put something in the paper.
The same was true with some, not all, of the newspapers. New York City
at its peak had a dozen daily newspapers not counting the ethnic newspapers.
The Forward is just one of many Jewish newspapers that published in New York City.

The bad news is only a small part of them are online. The New York Public
Library has links to some but requires a card or a visit to one of the branches.
FultonHistory.com has some New York newspapers and it is free.
There are several other paid pages as well. Also check the Brooklyn
Public Library because they loaded some -- not all -- the Brooklyn Eagle
which was one of the main newspaper of the era.

If you can visit the New York Public Library the branch on Fifth Avenue
at 42nd Street they have an excellent collection of the newspapers on microfilm.
Problem is most of the newspapers are not indexed. You need dates to
search the papers. But if you need the dates of death you can also at the
library check the New York City Death Index which shows the names,
dates and boroughs for the deaths. It is by year but can be used to
establish dates.

Allan Jordan


Pamela Weisberger
 

Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"

While it's unlikely they had an obituary if they were not prominent or
wealthy, there were many paid death notices in the Times and you can
get quite lucky by searching the digitized New York Times archives.
If you are a home -delivery subscriber to the Times anywhere in the
country, you can get a log on and password to search the archives for
free.

NYC libraries (and many others) will have the ProQuest databases
including the NY Times and many other papers. ProQuest is a paid
subscription service only available at universities and libraries and
individuals cannot pay for a subscription.

Note, however that anything considered "news" was covered so murders,
suicides, strange deaths (window cleaners falling, ptomaine poisoning,
domestic violence) were covered by reporters. So were the untimely
deaths of children on the lower east side at the turn of the century
in items like "Deaths of the Week" where the name, age and address was
provided by the paper. These were not notices paid for by the family,
just a regularly run column listing unfortunate deaths, so until you
go looking you can't be sure what you might find. The best rule is to
not assume just because someone wasn't famous you won't find a mention
of their death in a newspaper.

The Fulton Postcard site with other New York papers is also an
excellent resource, as is the Brooklyn Eagle.

ProQuest also offers a collection of historical American Jewish
newspapers. These often carried obituaries of more prominent Jews
throughout the U.S. including New York:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922) - a weekly Jewish
newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the
Jewish Messenger.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990) - a primary source of news and
information as well as a forum for discussion and debate.

The American Israelite (1854-2000) - the longest-running
English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United
States. The newspaper's two goals were to spread the principles of
Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs
and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990) - which carried news of developments in
Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over >from repressive regimes,
and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life.

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


RsH <robert.heuman@...>
 

Also see
http://www.lbi.org/collections/library/highlights-of-lbi-library-collecti=
on/periodicals/aufbau-york-ny-periodical/
for the period starting in 1934 for German Jewish immigrants re the
Aufbau.

( MOD: See also: http://tinyurl.com/nkdqugm )

Rsh

On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 23:22:27 -0800, you wrote:
Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"
R. S. (Bob) Heuman <robert.heuman@alumni.monmouth.edu>


Vivian Kahn
 

Check the paid death notices in the New York Times, which have been a
treasure trove for my research. In addition to info on the deceased,
this is an excellent way to identify the married names of female
siblings and daughters.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California


Mark Fearer <surmonk@gmail.com>
My question is, when our non-famous=20
immigrant ancestors who lived in Manhattan died, were they likely to
have an obituary in any local publications, between 1890-1940?
snip...


A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Pamela Weisberger

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.


Residents of New York State should be aware that they are entitled to a
New York Public Library card. You do not have to be a resident of New York
City specifically, but I think you have to go to the library to request
the card and have to show valid New York ID such as a driver's license.

With that you will be able to access all of the New York Public Library
resources which includes remote access to many of the databases being
described including all the Jewish newspapers on ProQuest.

If you are not a New York resident you can still use many of the
resources at the library in person. All the databases described are n
the library computers and available for use within the libraries.
In some cases you need to use the public computers and in some places they
will even loan you a laptop. TO use the databases you do not require
a card if you are at the building but it is also possible to get a visitor's
pass/card to use the systems and resources. Increasingly the NY Public
Library is requiring a card to do things such as request microfilms, books,
etc. even for use within the research libraries.

There's another great feature which is part of the inter-loan system for
all card holders. If you know a specific citation of an article and it is not
available at the NYPL you can request that they get you the specific article.
You do it by email and depending on how easy it is for them to find you
can get it in days or weeks via email. For example I just requested an
obituary which appeared in a local newspaper outside the New York area.
I also asked them to get me a specific article out of a California publication
and in less than two weeks I have a notice that a scan had been sent to
my account. All >from the comforts of my desk! and it is at no charge.
However if the item is in the library collection they will tell you that you
have to come to the library and do the look up yourself or else pay them
the research fees.

Allan Jordan


Richard
 

Subject: NYC newspapers
From: Mark Fearer <surmonk@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 11:22:42 -0500
snip...
Howdy - I've searched the Jewishgen info files, and wasn't
able to find an answer, although it's likely been discussed
here before, so my apologies. My question is, when our non-famous
immigrant ancestors who lived in Manhattan died, were they likely to
have an obituary in any local publications, between 1890-1940?
The Forward? It seems unlikely they would appear in the NY Times. Where - if
anywhere - might there be an obituary?

TIA
Mark Fearer


Re: New York City Newspapers

Hi Mark,

The New York Times is precisely where I have found an abundance of
obituaries for many people in my family tree and the good news is that
these obituaries have been digitised and are available through
Ancestry.com.

The period 1890 - 1940 seems to be particularly rich in obituaries,
commemorating the mightiest to the meekest!

Some obituary entries are really just death notices - while others
provide extensive and richly detailed information (married names of
daughters, grandchildren, sons/daughters in law, place of burial etc)

Large parts of my family tree data are due entirely to New York Times
obituaries.

I have absolutely no association with Ancestry.com, either directly or
indirectly, other than being a personal subscriber to their service.

Hope this helps Mark and good luck.

Richard Colburn
Chiangmai, Thailand