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New York Public Library advice #general


Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

Like many on this listserv, I've used New York Public Library
resources extensively, >from the copy of the Yizkor book for my
translation project to their online photo archive. I might have
some time in NYC soon and thought I'd go there in person. I'd
appreciate any pointers about what I might look for >from those
who have found genealogical resources at the NYPL that are not
accessible online.

I know that's almost a ridiculously broad question, but was there
some kind of data you came across in research there that made you
say to yourself, "Why didn't I know about that....why didn't I
ever look here before?"

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL ZLOTNICK
Wojnilow, Marty'Nuv Stary, Kovel, Bialystock


A. E. Jordan
 

The library's resources are extensive. They have a broad newspaper
collection on microfilm a lot of which is not online. They had
city directories. Specifically in genealogy they have the NYC
Voters' Registration on microfilm. Also they have a large Hebrew
and Yiddish collection and the whole Jewish room. They also have
the index for births and deaths in New York City that go way beyond
the online resources but they are by year and by name and only an
index but that can help.

I would say concentrate on things like books and these microfilm
resources which are not on line. They also have the map collection
in the Map Room, books like Who's Who and Who Was Who for many
countries.

But a few general words to the wise. Mostly you need a research
card so read up on the site about getting a visitor card because it
will save a lot of time and heartache when you are there.

Also the library moves at its own pace. So if you just have an hour
don't except to achieve a lot. Depending on what you want (and
having a researcher card) you can advance order items out of the
stacks to save time. A lot of the material is in closed stacks and
has to be pulled on request. Typically that can take up to an hour
if you do it on site.

It is sort of best to come up with the questions or objectives and
then see how the library can help in your research. Or else just go
an enjoy a look around the building which interesting in its own
right. The primary place you want to go fir this type of research
is the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street
in Manhattan. Unfortunately one of the great spaces is the Rose Main
Research Room on the third floor but it is closed till 2017 for
renovations.

Since you are >from Silver Spring, MD you might want to concentrate on
NYC resources if you need them at the library because a lot of the
International items you can get at the Library of Congress which is a
lot closer to home for you.

If you have specific questions feel free to contact me directly to
discuss since I do a lot of work in the building and know most of the
tricks of the trade there.

Allan Jordan

----Original Message-----
From: BDrake@...

I'd appreciate any pointers about what I might look for
from those who have found genealogical resources at the
NYPL that are not accessible online.


Carol Rombro Rider
 

It has been many years since I have done research in the New York
Public Library, but I seem to remember an excellent map collection
that they had. Yes, of course you can find wonderful maps online
now; however, I prefer to have a large map in front of me. The maps
are wonderfully detailed even as to geography. I can't remember the
name of the collection; perhaps someone else can help out on this.

I purchased half a dozen of them and have referred to them so many
times over the years that I finally went out and had them encapsulated.
They are wonderful to share with a large group, such as a JGS, since
people can handle them and there is no fear of damage.

Carol Rombro Rider
Baltimore, Maryland USA

<Like many on this listserv, I've used New York Public Library
resources extensively, >from the copy of the Yizkor book for my
translation project to their online photo archive. I might have
some time in NYC soon and thought I'd go there in person. I'd
appreciate any pointers about what I might look for >from those
who have found genealogical resources at the NYPL that are not
accessible online>


Bob Fitterman
 

They have death indexes for the entire city, year by year except for
one year in the 1960's. This can be very useful for locating dates of
death and therefore possibly death certificates. After about 1930
these include records for stillbirths, although they are segregated in
a separate section of the publication. The older volumes are on
microfilm, but print editions after about 1960. It ends some time in
the 1980's or 90's.

It's a great resource for locating deaths that are not covered by the
Social Security death index and occurred in New York City. I've never
seen this information anywhere else. It's a shame no one has digitized
this resource.

Bob Fitterman


A. E. Jordan
 

The NYPL has the death index for New York City in book and microfilm
through 1982 missing only 1967.

It is by year and then name and shows the name, age reported on the
death certificate, borough the person lived (died ?) in, the date of
death and certificate number. It also has notations of the medical
examiner was involved. It is the same index the NYC Health Department
uses.

Problem is that if it is a common name it can be hard to pinpoint the
person since there is no other information. And just because you
find someone in the index does not mean the Health Department will
release a copy of the death certificate. But at least once you find
them you can check newspapers for obits, look for probate records, etc.

The NYPL has a similar index on fiche and in book form for births in
NYC as well which is very useful.

On marriages they have microfilm of the original index but the years
are the same as what is online and at the Archives, ie it stops at
1937, so it is not a workaround.

Allan Jordan

-----Original Message-----
From: fitterman@...

They have death indexes for the entire city, year by year except for
one year.... It ends some time in
the 1980's or 90's.