Surname change in US Naturalization papers #general


Barbara <bj1friends@...>
 

"Rob Weisskirch asked about a name change >from Max CHARCHIRIN to Max
FISHKIN indicated on his naturalization papers, and whether that's
all that was required for a change of name vs. the formal process
used nowadays."

Any US citizen can change names informally at any time, provided that
it is not for purposes of fraud. A court order is not required.

My father and his two brothers changed their last name >from SLONIMSKY
to SLOAN in the late 1930's or early 1940's. They never went to court
to make it "legal," but it was legal anyway. My father enlisted in
the Army in the early 1940's under the name SLOAN, while one of my
uncles used SLONIMSKY. Therefore, their cemetery plaques
have SLOAN for dad and SLONIMSKY for my uncle.

My father's first name was also changed informally. He was named
Louis on his birth certificate in 1917, but by the 1920 census he is
called Lawrence. I only knew him as Larry and Larry is the name on
the cemetery plaque as well.

Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Shelley Mitchell
 

Rob Weisskirch asked about how a surname was changed in the past. Speaking only
about New York, I can say that the formal process in effect today is essentially the same
as the process at the turn of the century. You applied to the NY Supreme Court and
published the name change in the newspaper ordered by the Court. I can't speak for
any other state but I assume it would be similar or the same. On the other hand, with the
Naturalization of an alien, the federal government would be empowered to make that
change as well. I would venture to say that many celebrities didn't go through a formal
process since they were using Pseudonyms. I'm sure many of them still have their legal
names.

Shelley Mitchell
New York City


Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Rob Weisskirch asked about a name change >from Max CHARCHIRIN to Max
FISHKIN indicated on his naturalization papers, and whether that's
all that was required for a change of name vs. the formal process
used nowadays.

I answer - a formal name change is done via a court order. The
formal process leading to a court order a hundred years ago was
similar to the procedure used nowadays. However, a petition for
naturalization that is approved and admits somebody as a citizen is
also a court order - and often includes a name change. It
effectively bypasses the rest of the formal court procedure, but is
just as legal. So if the name change is mentioned on the petition,
it's a formal name change.

Ira

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


montereybayrob@...
 

Jewishgeners,

I recently received naturalization papers for Max FISHKIN which indicates
that he entered the country as Max CHARCHIRIN in 1906.Passenger lists to
NY and outgoing lists >from the UK confirm the general last name as CHARCHIRIN.

My question is if that is all one had to do to change his or her
surname by indicating so on the naturalization papers? Could a person
just say on his or her Declaration of Intention what the new surname
was? Or, was there a more formal process like there is today?

Thanks for insights,
Rob Weisskirch
Marina, CA