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Have you heard of Polanyu? #general


Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Also, has anyone suggested Polonnoye? See its Kehilalink:
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Polonnoye/index.html#BacgrndInfo

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


tom
 

Just one small correction: the term "dayan" means judge, almost certainly a
rabbi and member of a beth din (rabbinic court). And as a surname, it indicates
only that they are descended >from one, as the job is not considered hereditary
(even though sons often did follow in their father's footsteps).

A Kohen (priestly caste descended >from Aaron, who served in the temple in
Jerusalem) is not allowed to enter a cemetery, but there is no such restriction
on rabbis (otherwise they wouldn't be able to officiate at funerals). You will
probably also find that their Hebrew name includes "haKohen" at the end.

Entering a cemetery has nothing to do with being a "dayan".

....... tom klein, toronto

<Susan Gordon> Sjgwed@aol.com wrote:
Thanks to members' input and replies, I have reluctantly concluded that
"Polanyu" refers, simply, to Poland, and nothing more specific. In addition,
the family's "original" last name, "Dayan," is also very broad. In a letter
to one of his cousins, he did recall being a small boy waiting with his
father *outside the gates of a cemetery* in NYC, during a family funeral
because they could not enter. This makes sense, if they were "dayans."


sjgwed@...
 

Thanks to members' input and replies, I have reluctantly concluded that
"Polanyu" refers, simply, to Poland, and nothing more specific. In addition,
the family's "original" last name, "Dayan," is also very broad. In a letter
to one of his cousins, he did recall being a small boy waiting with his
father *outside the gates of a cemetery* in NYC, during a family funeral
because they could not enter. This makes sense, if they were "dayans."

As some of you may know, marital discord and divorces often lead to real
breakdowns in family ties and history that can spin out for generations.

Susan Gordon

<Susan Gordon> Sjgwed@aol.com wrote:

When I visited my long-estranged father shortly before his death, I asked
him where his immigrant father had come from. He said, "Polanyu" - which
sounded like "Po - lan - nyu." But I have been unable to locate this name as
a town, village or anything else in Galicia, Poland or elsewhere. Also,
I'm pretty sure his family name was "DAYAN," but it was Anglicized in the US.
Any suggestions? Thanks for your help!


sjgwed@...
 

When I visited my long-estranged father shortly before his death, I asked
him where his immigrant father had come from. He said, "Polanyu" - which
sounded like "Po - lan - nyu." But I have been unable to locate this name as
a town, village or anything else in Galicia, Poland or elsewhere. Also, I'm
pretty sure his family name was "DAYAN," but it was Anglicized in the US.
Any suggestions? Thanks for your help!

Susan Gordon, New York.