Deriving citizenship in 1916? #general


Susan&David
 

For the answer to your question about derivative citizenship in 1916 see
the last paragraph on this website:

https://socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu/federal/naturalization-process-in-u-s-early-history/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/9HaZAc ]

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 10/6/2017 11:28 AM, Wendy Griswold wendygris@gmail.com wrote:
Again, I've been out of the loop for quite a while so please forgive
if I ask an unsophisticated question.

In 1916, would a foreign-born woman automatically derive citizenship
from her American-born husband? Would there be paperwork? Although her
age on her marriage cert is 18, she might have been as young as 16.
It's very unlikely she would have naturalized at that age and even
less likely that her parents would have naturalized by 1916.


Wendy Griswold
 

Hello cousins.

Again, I've been out of the loop for quite a while so please forgive
if I ask an unsophisticated question.

In 1916, would a foreign-born woman automatically derive citizenship
from her American-born husband? Would there be paperwork? Although her
age on her marriage cert is 18, she might have been as young as 16.
It's very unlikely she would have naturalized at that age and even
less likely that her parents would have naturalized by 1916.

Thanks for any input.
B'shalom

Wendy Griswold
Pittsfield MA


Searching: BLITZ, PFEIFFER (all spellings) around Zhuravno, Lemberg
WENZELBERG, EINHORN, SHIFULDREM (all spellings) around Nowy Sacz
DWASS (LATER DAVIS), SOROKOFF around Ekaterinoslav


Phyllis Kramer
 

Wendy Griswald asked:
"In 1916, would a foreign-born woman automatically derive citizenship
from her American-born husband? Would there be paperwork? Although her
age on her marriage cert is 18, she might have been as young as 16.
It's very unlikely she would have naturalized at that age and even
less likely that her parents would have naturalized by 1916."

Wendy...yes a foreign born woman would automatically derive citizenship when
marrying an American citizen (up through 1922). There would be no paperwork;
she would use her husbands certificate. However, she could apply for a
document of derivative citizenship directly to the Immigration and
Naturalization Service and that letter would be in her file.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has the only nationwide
index of naturalization records >from 1906-1956 and is the only way to get
derivative certificate information. Requesting a file is a two-step process
with two sets of fees: $65 for a microfilm index search (Form G-1041) and $65
for the actual records (Form G1041A); forms are at http://www.uscis.gov/g-1041
For full details see https://www.uscis.gov/genealogy ; for the index
search see https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/genealogy/searching-index

I would also suggest following any state or federal census (familysearch.org or
ancestry.com) to verify the citizenship question.

Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko ...LINDNER, EICHEL from
Rohatyn, Burstyn ...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm