Seeking Family of Samuel Abramowitz Born Circa 1898 (in NY or Russia?) #general


Judith27
 

Dear JewishGendom,
I am having trouble searching for the parents and possible siblings of a Samuel
Abramowitz who lived in the New York City area before he passed away in 1982 ~ but
my main problem is not his last name but rather the accuracy of the information I
have as to where he may or may not have been born. >from his marriage license, his
death certificate, and the Social Security Death Index, I started with the
following initial data:

The parents of this Samuel Abramowitz were Morris Abramowitz and Sarah
Abramowitz. He was born either Dec. 6, 1895 in New York (Death Certificate), or
Dec. 14, 1898 in Manhattan (Marriage License Application), or 4 Dec 1898 (Social
Security Death Index).

I have searched repeatedly for him on the US Census, but whenever I find a
Sam/Samuel Abramowitz candidate with the right first named parents, and the right
birth year range -- he turns out to be listed as being born in Russia, not the US.
The main candidate here who turns up on the 1905 NY State Census, 1910 Census, and
1920 Census lived on Eldridge Street in Manhattan.

I have checked the NYC Birth Indexes at the NYC Municipal Archives but there is
no entry for a Sam/Samuel Abramowitz (or "male" or "infant") born in Manhattan in
December 1898 listed there. (Though there is a Sam Abramowitz born in Brooklyn in
Dec 1898 but his parents turned out to have completely different first names.) I
have also searched through the NYC Birth Indexes for the years 1895-1898.

Recently I visited the NY Public Library at 42nd Street and combed through both
the 1900 Census Soundex for New York and the 1920 Census Soundex for New York but
I still can't find a Morris Abramowitz with a son named Sam born circa 1895-1898
who was born in the US.

Could it be possible that someone who came here when he was a baby might have
thought he was born in NY like his younger siblings, and not across the ocean like
his older siblings?

I look forward to your comments, advice, and suggestions. And if anyone might be
familiar with the family of this Samuel Abramowitz, born circa 1895-1898, (either
in NY or elsewhere like Russia or England), who lived in Queens, NY, before he
passed away in 1982, and who was the son of Morris and Sarah Abramowitz, I look
forward to hearing >from you.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY


A. E. Jordan
 

Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan wrote:
Could it be possible that someone who came here when he was a baby might have
thought he was born in NY like his younger siblings, and not across the ocean like
his older siblings?

Hi Judy:

I would say emphatically yes to the question if someone could have been mistaken on
where they were born or said they were born in the USA and not the old country.

Depends on circumstances but remember the perception was you were "better" if you
were born in the USA and not an immigrant even if you parents had stepped off the
boat 15 minutes before you were born.

My own grandfather always said he was born in the USA and told stories about how
his parents had one family in the old country and another here. Only when I
started the research did I confirm they were all born in the old country but the
youngest sons came as small children and were of course raised in the USA. My
grandmother is born here and she always said her husband was born here too. I
started to find some papers even before the passenger list that showed that was a
story but even when I talked to my aunt she said her father was born in the USA.
In fact he immigrated at about age 4.

With your situation I would discount those facts and guess based on the paper
trail.

Good luck.

Allan Jordan


bernerfolk
 

Judi asked: Could it be possible that someone who came here when he was a baby
might have thought he was born in NY like his younger siblings, and not across the
ocean like his older siblings?

The short answer is yes, or he may have chosen to mis-state the facts as my family
did. My GM's older sibs, born 1884 and 1887 in Russia, came to NY prior to 1891.
The only record I have which shows their true birthplace is the 1900 census in
which they are in an orphanage. Every subsequent census (I can't find them in
1905), marriage, and death record I have for them shows birth in NY. My GM was
born in Russia shortly before her mother and sibs emigrated, she didn't come to NY
until ten years later. Her first marriage license in 1920 shows birth as NY but
records after that do show Russia and she did go through the citizenship process.
Her older sibs never did.

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


Susan J. Gordon
 

I think many late 19th c - early 20th c immigrants said they were born in America -
including my own beloved grandmother. Not until I studied her marriage certificate
- which listed "Czernowitz" as her birthplace - did I realize she had (gently)
lied, and arrived at Ellis Island at the age of 4 or 5 - old enough to remember the
journey, but young enough to shed her foreign accent and speak English like a
native-born American.

Susan J. Gordon

Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan wrote:
Could it be possible that someone who came here when he was a baby might have
thought he was born in NY like his younger siblings, and not across the ocean ...

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