When did patronymic names become surnames? #general


Jake Jacobs
 

I am struggling with family names. Found a record on JRI-Poland for my g'g'aunt,
born 1820 in Poland (perhaps Suwalki). According to her gravestone (in Chicago),
her father was Aharon. Birth record of her son, born in Suwalki 1861, lists her
maiden name as Jankielowska. We know Aharon is not the same as Jankiel, so is
Jankielowska a last name or a patronymic name? When would real surnames have
begun in Suwalki? Before that time, would patronymics have been used?

Many thanks for help-
Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Alexander Sharon
 

Diane Jacobs wrote:
I am struggling with family names. Found a record on JRI-Poland for my
g'g'aunt, born 1820 in Poland (perhaps Suwalki). According to her
gravestone (in Chicago), her father was Aharon. Birth record of her son,
born in Suwalki 1861, lists her maiden name as Jankielowska. We know Aharon
is not the same as Jankiel, so is Jankielowska a last name or a patronymic
name? When would real surnames have begun in Suwalki? Before that time,
would patronymics have been used?


Diane,

The two main groups of Jewish surnames origin were toponysm (place names)
and patronymics.

In Russia proper set of rules that have governed Jewish surnames
were introduced initially on December 9, 1804 bit due to slow progress have been
reinforced in 1835 and again, in 1850.

In Russian Poland ten guberniyas surnames were adopted in 1821.

Jankielowska, a female surname variation of male surname Jankielowski. If
Jankiel was her father, she was officially known as:
Her first name, Aharonowna (or Aronovna), ie daughter of Aharon (Aron)
Jankielowska.

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB