Migration patterns from Lithuania to Latvia #latvia


Feige Stern
 

Hello fellow Latvia researchers,
My Schenker family lived in Dankera (aka Glazmanka, Gostini) Latvia,
but I learned that they were originally >from Birzai, Lithuania. I've
noticed that a number of other researchers' families also followed
that migration pattern, and I wonder if anyone knows the reason for
this? Was there some event that caused so many >from Birzai to move
to the Courland area of Latvia? I would be interested to hear >from
other researchers if you've ever learned about this.
Thanks for your thoughts about this.
Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH
Researching:
SCHENKER: Birzai, Lithuania and Dankera, Latvia; MEILECH: Dankera,
Latvia: KOLOVARSKY: Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN: Rasseiniai,
Lithuania; HOFFMAN: Kishinev, Moldova; SCHWARTZ: Braila, Rumania;
SOBEL: Kleparov and Rokitno, Ukraine; PROPST: Lvov, Ukraine;
TEICHMANN: Rokitno, Ukraine and Dresden, Germany; SINSHEIMER:
Freinsheim, Germany


Sue Levy
 

May I add my voice to Feige Kauvar Stern's query about migration >from Birzai
to Latvian Courland? My grandmother's grandfather Helman GUTMAN came from
Birzai, according to records provided by the Latvia State Archive. He
married Frada WESTERMAN (b. 1824) in Jaunjelgava, and records show they
brought children into the world in both towns but stayed in Jaunjelgava.

We have often wondered how he came to be in Jaunjelgava - not a great
distance by today's reckoning, but quite a journey back then. Was it for
trade, or to seek a wife, or to escape >from something in his hometown?

Sue Levy
Perth, Australia

GUTMAN (Birzai); GUTMAN, WEINER, WESTERMAN (Jaunjelgava)


Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Cousins,
I would be interested in whatever people have learned. My only thought here
is that Lithuania is land-locked and Courland/Latvia had a port, so maybe
people migrated so that they could have access to ships. Other than that, I
know that my Edelberg family (paternal grandmother's) went >from Courland to
the Southern Ukraine (Kherson Guberniya) in 1840 while some of the family
stayed in Courland. Also my paternal grandfather's family came >from Odessa
to the US, and there is some DNA evidence that this family may have
originated in Lithuania. Since my paternal grandmother was sent to my
paternal grandfather's family in 1913 when she came to the US, this
indicates that the families had known each other in the old country. For
how long and when and where the families knew each other I do not know.
Sarah L M Christiansen
Georgetown TX 78633
Searching: Hite/Khait/Chait, Edelberg, Perchik, Birgardovsky (all paternal)
and others
http://genealogy.smcactuary.net


Steven Greenberg <steve@...>
 

Feige,

I too have the same interest. I had always believed one line of my
tree originated in Kraslava in Latvia just to the East of Daugavpils
(Dvinsk). Indeed, after uncovering the address of my 2nd great
grandmother in Kraslava, I visited (twice now).

But, more recently, I have learned that the family moved >from Kowno
(Kaunas) to Kraslava some time in the 1880s for reasons unknown.
Contemporaneously, a large number of the family emigrated to the US.

I can only assume that some political or natural event caused the
sudden migration. I intend to investigate.

Steven Greenberg
Boca Raton, Florida

Researching:
KAHAN (KAHN) in Latvia/Lithuania (Kraslava/Kaunas)
URETSKY in Belarus (Karpovitz) REINFELD in Poland (Lubaczow)
HOLTZ in Poland (Lubaczow) ERTAG in Ukraine (Grodek)
KUSHNIROVE in Ukraine (Zlatopil)
GREENBERG in Ukraine (Gwozdziec)
ROSENWASSER in Ukraine (Gwozdziec)

---
From: Feige Stern <feigestern@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Dec 2016 03:16:29 -0500

Hello fellow Latvia researchers,
My Schenker family lived in Dankera (aka Glazmanka, Gostini) Latvia,
but I learned that they were originally >from Birzai, Lithuania. I've
noticed that a number of other researchers' families also followed
that migration pattern, and I wonder if anyone knows the reason for
this? Was there some event that caused so many >from Birzai to move
to the Courland area of Latvia? I would be interested to hear >from
other researchers if you've ever learned about this.


Feige Stern
 

Hello my fellow researchers:

I received helpful emails >from several other researchers that I thought
I would share with you regarding the reasons for moving >from Lithuania
to Latvia.

Two people suggested that the reasons were primarily economic. One of
these people noted that the territory of Latvia was outside the Pale of
Settlement, and that once it was opened to Jews, people came for
economic and trade possibilities.

Another person noted that the coming of rail transport placed a premium
on getting grain >from what is now Ukraine to the Baltic ports- Libau,
Riga, Klaipeda, etc., for export to Western Europe. Many Jews were
merchants in this trade.

Another researcher was nice enough to study the map for me, and pointed
out the proximity of Glazmanka, Latvia (the town of my Grandfather) to
Birzai, Lithuania, where the family had migrated from.

I want to thank everyone who was kind enough to take the time to share
their thoughts and research with me.

Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH

---
Original query:
Hello fellow Latvia researchers,
My Schenker family lived in Dankera (aka Glazmanka, Gostini) Latvia,
but I learned that they were originally >from Birzai, Lithuania. I've
noticed that a number of other researchers' families also followed that
migration pattern, and I wonder if anyone knows the reason for this?
Was there some event that caused so many >from Birzai to move to the
Courland area of Latvia? I would be interested to hear >from other
researchers if you've ever learned about this.


Ann Rabinowitz
 

The borders between Lithuania and Latvia were quite porous in the time
when our ancestors lived there and there was much crossing back and
forth especially in the towns near the border. There were many reasons
for this migration, primary amongst them marriage, economic opportunity,
illnesses and natural disasters, primarily flooding and fires.

I would suggest that when you are researching this topic that you make a
chronology. In fact, if you go to the following site for Kaunas you can
easily note many of the problems that the town had during the time your
family lived there:

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_lita/lit_00512.html

The newspapers of the day can also provide you with some indication of
possible reasons for familial departure and these can be found on
Ancestry.com, findmypast.co.uk, and other sites which provide possible
documentation of aid given to sufferers of disasters such as the Joint.

An example of why someone would move is the natural disaster of flooding
which Latvia and Lithuania suffered >from quite a number of times in the
spring of the year. For instance, there was a monumental flood in 1888
and another one in 1931 which affected both countries and caused
numerous towns to be submerged, especially Kaunas which had 300 houses
submerged. As a result, many families found they lost their homes and
businesses and they then moved to other dryer places.

In a few days, I will discuss this topic further and be continuing my
series of "Cycle of Life" which you can find posted on the JewishGen Blog
with an additional posting which will be on Facebook. Sorry, I cannot
post on this digest as the verbiage will be too long.

Ann Rabinowitz
arabinow@bellsouth.net


Menachem Sella <sella@...>
 

Steven,

At the time migration took place there were no clear borders between
Latvia and Lithuania, languages did not matter and young Jews who had
no property or business attachment to a certain shtetl were looking
for jobs (and spouses) all around. Latvia/Lithuania were practically,
especially around today's border, the same country.

My grandfather, Yitzhak Slaviciski, who graduated as a rabbi, >from the
Slabodka and Ponivej yeshivas, in Lithuania, was looking for a rabbi
position in shtetls in Lithuania, and eventually settled for a butcher/
mohel position in Tukums, Latvia, where, in a neighboring town he met
and married my grandmother. My father was born in Tukums. He moved to
Israel in 1933 and his entire family perished in the holocaust.

Menachem sella

From: Steven Greenberg <steve@coolchange.org>
Date: Thu, 15 Dec 2016 23:51:50 -0500

I too have the same interest. I had always believed one line of my
tree originated in Kraslava in Latvia just to the East of Daugavpils
(Dvinsk). Indeed, after uncovering the address of my 2nd great
grandmother in Kraslava, I visited (twice now).

But, more recently, I have learned that the family moved >from Kowno
(Kaunas) to Kraslava some time in the 1880s for reasons unknown.
Contemporaneously, a large number of the family emigrated to the US.

I can only assume that some political or natural event caused the
sudden migration. I intend to investigate.


Wendy Freebourne <art@...>
 

Fellow researchers

My Lithuania/Latvia story is that my maternal great grandmother, Sarah,
was born in Pokroy, Lithuania. However, her daughter, Annie, was born
in Lemsal, Livland (now Limbazi) in Latvia. In the UK her papers say
she was a native of Riga. My grandfather's (Morris) papers also say he
was a native of Riga, so both of Sarah's children were probably born in
Latvia. I have not yet found her husband, Elias Moscovitch. Both my
grandfather Morris and his father Elias were 'teachers', which, I
suspect, was a semi-rabbinical profession.

My maternal grandmother's, Fanny, family also came >from Pokroy and
family story tells that my grandfather Morris came to Pokroy, Lithuania,
to teach my grandmother and her sisters English. It is possible that
there was some family connection through his mother, whose maiden name I
have not yet found.

Wendy Freebourne
Researching: BRENER, Pokroy, Lithuania, MOSCOVITCH, Latvia
art@wendyfreebourne.com


Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

My family too were part of this Lithuania to Latvia migration, who
eventually left Rezekne, Latvia for Leeds, UK.

According to the documents I have received >from the Latvian Archives
my ggrandfather "Schmuil (also Schmuil-Mordka, Schmul-Morduch) son of
Mowscha-Hirsch Kasimov (sic) (other spelling of the surname - KOSIMOV,
KUSIMOV) was born ca 1850 (he was registered as agd 52 in 1902). Till
1902 he was registered in the Jewish community in Antolepti, Novo-
Alexandrovsk (now Zarasai) district, Kovno province (now Lithuania).
The family of Schmuil KASIMOV was registered in the Jewish community of
Rezekne since August 17 of 1902. His wife Fruma (Freida), daughter of
Michel (maiden name is not stated) was born in ca 1853 (she was
registered as aged 49 in 1902)."

So, I'm in the same boat, so to speak, as many others.

I dont know why they migrated to Rezekne, except that that had a family
connection there by the name of MULVIDSON (connection yet to be solved).

The reason they immigrated to the UK was their oldest son ran away >from
the Russian army.

Regards,

Angie Elfassi
Israel

Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds


Jon Seligman
 

Migration between Lithuania and Latvia cannot really be defined as migration
until the 1920s. Neither existed as a national or internal national
division, but were split up into Gubernia (Governates) within the Russian
Empire. Lithuania and Latvia were covered by the Gubernia of Livonia,
Courland, Kovno, Vilna, Vitebsk, Grodno and Minsk. Movement >from one to the
other was constant and was internal movement (much like moving >from state to
state in the US) rather than a national migration that indicated a pattern.

Jon Seligman

Researching:
LEDERMAN/FLEISHMAN - Shadova/Seduva (Kovno Gubernia) now Lithuania
GILLIS - Kretinga (Kovno Gubernia) now Lithuania
JOFFE - Kraslava (Vitebsk Gubernia) now Latvia
SELIGMAN - Dvinsk/Daugavpils (Vitebsk Gubernia) now Latvia, Slobodka
(Vilna Gubernia) now Belarus