Topics

post WWI residence #lithuania


steven weiss <szome@...>
 

If a family was living in Litvak shtetl X around 1900 what is the
likelihood that the family was living in the same shtetl after 1918. I
am attempting to ascertain whether my family that remained in Lithuania
was living in the same shtetl where my grandfather was born in 1890. If
the Jews were expelled >from this shtetl in 1915, is it likely that they
returned after WWI. Any information would be appreciated.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
KANTOR and SCHWARTZBERG >from Panemunelis, Skapiskis, Rokiskis.


kenneth pollan <kpollan@...>
 

It's possible. It's also possible they lived in a nearby village. Can you
get names of nearby shetls?

Pam Pollan

steven weiss wrote:

If a family was living in Litvak shtetl X around 1900 what is the
likelihood that the family was living in the same shtetl after 1918. I
am attempting to ascertain whether my family that remained in Lithuania
was living in the same shtetl where my grandfather was born in 1890. If
the Jews were expelled >from this shtetl in 1915, is it likely that they
returned after WWI. Any information would be appreciated.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
KANTOR and SCHWARTZBERG >from Panemunelis, Skapiskis, Rokiskis.


Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

There is really no knowing whether people returned to the same place after
they had been expelled in WWI. If their homes had been destroyed, they
might have rebuilt or moved on. If their homes were still standing, they
might have felt compelled morally not to return to the same place that
expelled them.

Martha Lev-Zion


cat2steve@...
 

I've also been wondering what happened to my family in
Lithuania after WWI. According to an elderly cousin, my
SNYDER family in Baltimore communicated frequently with our
SCHNEIDER cousins who remained in Lithuania, but all contact
was broken off after the Russian and Bolshevik Revolutions
and no more was ever heard >from them again. I've always
wondered what happened to them. I've checked the Russian
Counselar Records with no luck. Any other ideas?

Unfortunately, that elderly cousin is now deceased, so
I've lost a potential gold mine of information.
***TALK TO THOSE PEOPLE NOW!***
For me, this occurred at the beginning of my genealogy
research when I was a novice and didn't even know what to ask.
Not even the name of the shtetl they came from. (I've learned
it since then). All I can say is, "Oh well."

Steve Snyder
cat2steve@...
Reston, Virginia


DBH12345
 

In a message dated 2/16/99 11:28:22 AM Pacific Standard Time,
martha@... writes:

<< There is really no knowing whether people returned to the same place after
they had been expelled in WWI. If their homes had been destroyed, they
might have rebuilt or moved on. If their homes were still standing, they
might have felt compelled morally not to return to the same place that
expelled them.

Martha Lev-Zion >>

Martha's argument is sound, but there are definite exceptions: in order to
obtain Lithuanian citizenship and any related passports and official
documents, people would have to provide either certified copies of their birth
records, or affidavits asserting that they were who they claimed to be,
sometimes signed by numerous people. They would have to locate former
neighbors in order to do this.

Many people had owned property that they were able to reclaim. Others were
deeply involved in the Jewish communities >from which they came -- not only
towns. Much of this information is documented the Lithuanian Communities
Between the Wars Collection of YIVO. Please refer to Deena Berton's excellent
article in the Online Journal at our website for more information:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/journal.htm >

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Howard Margol
 

In a message dated 2/16/99 11:28:22 AM Pacific Standard Time,
martha@... writes:

<< There is really no knowing whether people returned to the same place after
they had been expelled in WWI. If their homes had been destroyed, they
might have rebuilt or moved on. If their homes were still standing, they
might have felt compelled morally not to return to the same place that
expelled them.

Martha Lev-Zion >>

One response was the following:

<<Martha's argument is sound, but there are definite exceptions: in order to
obtain Lithuanian citizenship and any related passports and official
documents, people would have to provide either certified copies of their birth
records, or affidavits asserting that they were who they claimed to be,
sometimes signed by numerous people. They would have to locate former
neighbors in order to do this.>>

I am not so sure that the requirements and documentation were so strict at the
time. Before the records were sent to Vilnius last year ( I have failed to
locate them as yet) the Metrical arichive in Panevezys contained Jewish vital
records for Panevezys and the Panevezys District, dating back to 1880. This
particular archive is only supposed to have records for the post World War I
period. When I was at the archive in 1997, and asked why those pre-World War I
records were stored there, this was the explanation I was given.

"After many Jews returned to the area in 1919, 1920, etc. they found that a
number of vital records had been destroyed. Any Jew could come to the archive
and give the information for births, marriages, divorces, and deaths that had
occurred prior to World War I. The only requirement necessary was they had to
bring one witness to verify the information".

This would indicate that not only were the resulting records not 100% accurate
but also there was no strict regulations in place as to who was giving what
information. If voter registration records for the early 1920's can be found
for a particular town or area, that may give a good indication of who returned
after World War I. Additionally, they may have lived in a small shtetl prior
to World War I and, if they did return, they may have decided to live in a
larger city like Panevezys rather than return to the shtetl.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia