Revision list dates #lithuania


David W. Perle
 

Matthew Rosenberg posted about revision list entries for his family which
predate when [he believes that] they were born, wondering about errors
in transcription.

While possible, I think that it's more likely that the believed dates
of their birth are probably wrong. I've also come across this sort of
thing, a great-grandfather of mine in particular. A few U.S. records
after he immigrated here consistently provide his age/year of birth
in Lithuania, but then I found two or three Lithuanian revision lists
showing him as having been something like 5 years older!

Explanations for why people become "younger" after immigrating vary.
One is that people just didn't always actually know their ages or dates
of birth, so they guessed that bit when they immigrated to a place like
the U.S. where that's a bureaucratic stat that's asked of them. Another
explanation is that women in particular--especially Lithuanian--were
very vain about age and kept their ages lower, and their husbands did
the same just so that they wouldn't "be" so much older than their wives!

I've concluded that my great-grandfather was *probably* a few years older
than his family ever knew. In the end...who knows!

David Perle
Washington, DC


David Ellis
 

David Perle writes about his g-gf's birth date:

I think that it's more likely that the believed dates of their birth
are probably wrong....
A few U.S. records after he immigrated here consistently provide his
age/year of birth in Lithuania, but then I found two or three Lithuanian
revision lists showing him as having been something like 5 years
older!

My experience is similar, but I came to a different conclusion. My g-gf was
listed on a variety of US records (census, naturalization, death) with an
age implying he was born in 1851 or 1852. The 1858 revision list from
Lithuania shows his age as 9, implying a birth in 1849. But the previous
revision list, >from 1850-1851, showed his parents as married with no
children. So in this particular case I would give more credence to his
birth date being 1851 or 1852.


------
David J Ellis
Natick, MA 01760
djemkitso@verizon.net


Rita or Paul Gordon <prg202@...>
 

Message for David Perle : Check the Census records in the community
where he lived. Maryland
Census Records are good.

Rita Simon Gordon
prg202@comcast.net

-----Original Message-----
From: LitvakSIG digest
Subject: Revision list dates
From: "David W. Perle" <dwperle@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 12:22:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Matthew Rosenberg posted about revision list entries for his family which
predate when [he believes that] they were born, wondering about errors
in transcription.

While possible, I think that it's more likely that the believed dates
of their birth are probably wrong. I've also come across this sort of
thing, a great-grandfather of mine in particular. A few U.S. records
after he immigrated here consistently provide his age/year of birth
in Lithuania, but then I found two or three Lithuanian revision lists
showing him as having been something like 5 years older!

Explanations for why people become "younger" after immigrating vary.
One is that people just didn't always actually know their ages or dates
of birth, so they guessed that bit when they immigrated to a place like
the U.S. where that's a bureaucratic stat that's asked of them. Another
explanation is that women in particular--especially Lithuanian--were
very vain about age and kept their ages lower, and their husbands did
the same just so that they wouldn't "be" so much older than their wives!

I've concluded that my great-grandfather was *probably* a few years older
than his family ever knew. In the end...who knows!

David Perle
Washington, DC