Question concerning tombstones #rabbinic


Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I want to thank everyone who has responded so far. I've received some
very thoughtful answers on the issue.

Best,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL


Shlomo Katz
 

from my observations, that acronym was very liberally used on
tombstones as well as on ketubot and other documents. It seems to
have been similar to the way we call people "Reb so-and-so" today.
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


Lynn Saul <lynnsaul@...>
 

The designation "morenu" is our teacher--probably considered a rabbi
because of Jewish scholarship. Not all were "Official graduates" as
we have today.
I recommend the book "Lithuanian Yeshivot of the 19th c" by Stampfer
and also his book "Families Rabbis and Education" for an overview of
your ancestor's situation. (mine too, one a dayan amd the other moreh.)

Lynn Saul

From: Michael Waas <mwaas1989@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Jul 2012 10:32:54 -0400
I have a question that has come up lately that I'd like to see
answered. In my family and in a relative's family, we have a few
ancestors and associated family with the notation of MOH''R on their
tombstones. Yet, for all of the deceased, we have absolutely no record
of them as a rabbi (thus far). As far as I know, the appelation of
Moreinu HaRav only appears on the matsevot of rabbis.
...


Ben Turin
 

MOH"R is often used an an honorific for an individual who was a
knowledgeable learned lay-person. I have a number of those in my
family as well.

From: Michael Waas <mwaas1989@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Jul 2012 10:32:54 -0400
I have a question that has come up lately that I'd like to see
answered. In my family and in a relative's family, we have a few
ancestors and associated family with the notation of MOH''R on their
tombstones. Yet, for all of the deceased, we have absolutely no record
of them as a rabbi (thus far). As far as I know, the appelation of
Moreinu HaRav only appears on the matsevot of rabbis.
--
Ben Turin
www.genetrail.com


Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I have a question that has come up lately that I'd like to see
answered. In my family and in a relative's family, we have a few
ancestors and associated family with the notation of MOH''R on their
tombstones. Yet, for all of the deceased, we have absolutely no record
of them as a rabbi (thus far). As far as I know, the appelation of
Moreinu HaRav only appears on the matsevot of rabbis.

I can send one of the relevant pictures to Viewmate and the other two
are on viewmate already.

For the record at least one of the deceased is definitively from
Latvia, buried in Talsen, and the others are possibly >from Zidikai in
Lithuania and buried in Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn. If they were
indeed rabbis, would there be anyway to find information about them as
rabbis? For one of the deceased, I'm pretty sure is son is listed in a
subscription list >from Talsen, but I can't be too sure.

Best,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL

RESEARCHING: GLASER, LEVENSON, BLUMBERG, FEITELBERG (Piltene, Vindava,
Talsen, Kandava, Riga)