Missing Pieces of the Puzzle #ukraine


Landwave <landwave@...>
 

Dear Fellow Ukraine Researchers,

One of the reasons all of us are fascinated by genealogy is because in
finding out about our ancestors' lives, we are learning more about our
own identities. This point was driven home to me during a recent trip I
made to Europe.

I've just returned >from a visit with my son & daughter-in-law who are
both teaching in Turkey. On the route home, we made a long-anticipated
stop to meet my mother's first cousin & her family, all descended from
my great-grandfather, Pesach GOTLIBOVICH. This was an especially awaited
meeting, as the branches of our family had not seen each other in over
95 years! For 50 of those years, the North American branch had been
convinced that no-one left behind in the Ukraine had survived the 2nd
world war. (I learned through subsequent correspondence that our
relatives had successfully evaded the Nazis by escaping eastward to the
Ural mountains.)

My initial efforts in genealogy about 25 years ago were motivated by
the desire to learn about this family (that of my grandfather's
siblings) who had once sent him postcards >from Cherkassy, Kiev. Although
I discovered many other relatives during my searches, it was not until
1995 that I accidently stumbled across information that led me to the
address that would bring us all together. Our very first exchange of
letters confirmed that my cousin Polina was every bit as excited as I
was to reconnect our isolated branches. In fact she had been trying to
find us as well, but had mistakenly searched in the USA as she only
remembered that my grandfather & his sister had emigrated to "America"-
a generic term for the "New World". It never occurred to her to check in
Canada!

Last year, my son & his wife exchanged visits with our newly
discovered cousins & were the first to meet them after all these years.
(My mother's cousin Polina, her daughter Irina, & granddaughter Nina,
have been living in Germany for about 6 years since the collapse of the
Russian economy.) This month, my husband & I were finally able to make
the trip, & our reunion was a loving & joyful one. Polina is the image
of my mother, & they insist that I look just like her late sister!
Moreover, when my husband developed a cold during our stay, Polina & I
compared cough remedies. She is the only person who knew exactly what I
meant when I said my mother used to make a "goggle-moggle", & to prove
our common ancestry, she proceeded to put one together to ease my
husbamd's throat. (Until then, I always believed that the term was
fabricated by my aunts in Canada! Instead, it turns out to be a "family
recipe" - probably one many of you might even recognize: hot milk,
sugar, egg, & butter - simple & practical, but with a name that further
substantiated our common roots!)

For those detractors of genealogy who cynically say that, as
genealogists, we are "dwelling in the past", & that they "prefer to live
in the present", all I can say is that genealogy is truly about the
living present ... While it is natural for family ties to dissipate &
die out as we age, genealogy gives us a second chance to expand &
appreciate our extended relationships.

I'm now in close touch with many others >from my GOTLIBOVICH roots, &
I'm grateful for all of the rewards my research & labours have brought
me. They're all about living people & the present!!

Good luck to all of you, & I wish you similar successes.
Florence Elman
<haflo@cadvision.com>
Canada

ELMAN researching: MACHERET - Zolotonosha, Ukraine; PRESSMAN - Dolginov,
Vilenskaya (Vileyka); SURIS/SURES - Odessa, Ukraine; WEISSBEIN/VAJSBEJN
Odessa, Ukraine; NERENBERG - Sokoletz, Podolsk, Ukraine;
ZILBERBERG/SILBERBERG - Nova Ushitsa, Podolia, [Kamenets-Podolsk];
GOTLIBOVICH/GOTLIBOWITZ/GOTLIEB - Cherkassy, Korsun, Kharkov, &
H/Gorodishche, Ukraine; KATSOVITCH - Minsk & Vileyka


Naomi Moderick <naomi_mod@...>
 

Genealogy does give us a another chance to extend and appreciate our
extended relationships. I have just found some relatives on my paternal
grandfather's side and am getting to know them.

I got a kick out of the cough remedy. I haven't heard the expression
goggle-moggle since I was a little girl. My grandmother >from Zhitomir
would make that for me. There are also other names that my mother's
family used that no one else seems to know. I'm not sure of the
spellings, but a pot roast on the stove was a Zaraza, and fired matzoh was
Preshnitza. I wondered if anyone has heard of these names.

Naomi Moderick, Skokie, IL.

Researching WAGNER and ANNOPOLSKY, ANAPOLSKY >from Zhitomir;
MUDRICK >from Kamenets-Podolskiy; FISHMAN >from Satanov.



Florence Elman wrote:
When my husband developed a cold during our stay, Polina & I
compared cough remedies. She is the only person who knew exactly what I
meant when I said my mother used to make a "goggle-moggle", & to prove
our common ancestry, she proceeded to put one together to ease my
husbamd's throat.


arlene <aparnes@...>
 

An exciting story to be sure. Congratulations!

Are you aware that there was an EDWARD ELMAN in Brooklyn during the 1970's?
He served on the Executive Committee of the New York Federation of Reform
Synagogues, part of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. I believe
he also served on the national Bd of Trustees of the organization, but can't
really remember.
Arlene


Barbara <maybug@...>
 

Hello Naomi,

I'm happy for you that you've had such success. In this posting I noticed
your reference to Zhitomir. As I'm very deficient in Jewish information,
both cultural and religious, perhaps you could fill me in of Zhitomir. I
recently discovered that my gf was buried in Philadelphia in a section of a
cemetery belonging the Synagogue Tiferes (eth?) Israel Anshei Zitomor(-mer)
in 1915. Would that be a synagogue of people >from that area? Where
exactly is Zhitomor? Any other info that I'm too uninformed to ask?

Regards,

Barbara Harris









.


roman.vilner@...
 

I would be extremely cautious basing family connections
on the names of cold remidies used in the families. My
family used those as well, as I am sure have many
others. Generally speaking, it's akin to saying that
all families that use tylenol while calling it aspirin
are related. Sorry to disillusion you, but it's just
another one of jewish names for something that I am sure
was very commonly used.

Roman Vilner
roman.vilner@att.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please remember to sign your name when you mail into the List!

Dear Florence,
I was very inspired by your message to keep trying to make those connections with my family. I certainly remember my mother (>from Vakhnovke/Vinnitza) making us that old cold remedy (we pronounced it "gorggle-morggle"), and it really worked.
I have a branch of my father's family who emigrated to Toronto, Canada. So far they have not been too forthcoming with dates, etc. Is there any way to research in the Canadian Archives other than writing directly to them? ...
Sonia Pasis
Rockville, Md
Florence wrote:
... On the route home, we made a long-anticipated stop to meet my mother's first cousin & her family ... as the branches of our family had not seen each other in over 95 years! ... when my husband developed a cold during our stay, Polina & I compared cough remedies. She is the only person who knew exactly what I meant when I said my mother used to make a "goggle-moggle", & [as if] to prove our common ancestry, she proceeded to put one together to ease my husband's throat.


Sonyaskter@...
 

Dear Florence,

I was very inspired by your message to keep trying to make those connections
with my family. I certainly remember my mother (>from Vakhnovke/Vinnitza)
making us that old cold remedy (we pronounced it "gorggle-morggle"), and it
really worked.

I have a branch of my father's family who emigrated to Toronto, Canada. So
far they have not been too forthcoming with dates, etc. Is there any way to
research in the Canadian Archives other than writing directly to them? I
don't think there is anything on the Internet. I'm afraid without specific
dates, I won't come up with much.

Sonia Pasis
Rockville, Md

Berdichev - KUPSOW, KURTZ, PASIS/PASSIS
Buchne/Medzibodz/Letichev/Rowno/Canada - COHEN/KLATZ, CUPCOW/KUPSOW
(diff.spellings), FISHMAN
Kalinovka, Vakhnovka - CHERNOV, FURMAN, MUCHNIK, SCHREIBER
Lutsk (Pol.?) - SOKOLOFF
Vinnitsa - BORISOV/BORISHEVSKY, GORDON/GORDISHEFSKY

In a message dated 11/16/00 7:53:05 PM Eastern Standard Time,
landwave@ican.net writes:

<< Subj: [ukraine] Missing Pieces of the Puzzle

One of the reasons all of us are fascinated by genealogy is because in
finding out about our ancestors' lives, we are learning more about our
own identities. This point was driven home to me during a recent trip I
made to Europe.

... On the route home, we made a long-anticipated
stop to meet my mother's first cousin & her family, all descended from
my great-grandfather, Pesach GOTLIBOVICH. This was an especially awaited
meeting, as the branches of our family had not seen each other in over
95 years! For 50 of those years, the North American branch had been
convinced that no-one left behind in the Ukraine had survived the 2nd
world war. (I learned through subsequent correspondence that our
relatives had successfully evaded the Nazis by escaping eastward to the
Ural mountains.)

My initial efforts in genealogy about 25 years ago were motivated by
the desire to learn about this family (that of my grandfather's
siblings) who had once sent him postcards >from Cherkassy, Kiev.... it was not until 1995 that I accidently stumbled across information that led me to the address that would bring us all together. Our very first exchange of
letters confirmed that my cousin Polina was every bit as excited as I
was to reconnect our isolated branches. In fact she had been trying to
find us as well, but had mistakenly searched in the USA as she only
remembered that my grandfather & his sister had emigrated to "America"-
a generic term for the "New World". It never occurred to her to check in
Canada!

Last year, my son & his wife exchanged visits with our newly
discovered cousins & were the first to meet them after all these years.
... This month, my husband & I were finally able to make
the trip, & our reunion was a loving & joyful one. Polina is the image
of my mother, & they insist that I look just like her late sister!
Moreover, when my husband developed a cold during our stay, Polina & I
compared cough remedies. She is the only person who knew exactly what I
meant when I said my mother used to make a "goggle-moggle", & to prove
our common ancestry, she proceeded to put one together to ease my
husbamd's throat. (Until then, I always believed that the term was
fabricated by my aunts in Canada! Instead, it turns out to be a "family
recipe" - probably one many of you might even recognize: hot milk,
sugar, egg, & butter - simple & practical, but with a name that further
substantiated our common roots!)

For those detractors of genealogy who cynically say that, as
genealogists, we are "dwelling in the past", & that they "prefer to live
in the present", all I can say is that genealogy is truly about the
living present ...
Florence Elman
<haflo@cadvision.com>
Canada
>>


rokoco1@...
 

My mother used to make me "google-moogle" when I had laryngitis. It
consisted of an egg yolk beaten with lots of sugar. Does this sound like
your remedy? Perhaps remedies familiar to some families shows that these
remedies were used in certain areas.

Sincerely,

Bobbi Cohen
San Diego, Ca Rokoco1@al.com


ebus135@...
 

I remember my grandmother making goggle moggle.I have pains to this day
everytime I remember it. She was >from Mogilev Podolsk.

Linda Shubert
Canada

MODERATOR'S NOTE: After today's Digest is sent out, this thread will be closed. The input has been interesting & informative, but we'll get back to "genealogy" again. :-)


Altefox@...
 

I noticed your listing of a Chernov. My father's family came >from a town
called Samgorodok near Kiev. I was curious if there is any relationship.
Len Chernos


Gamulka@...
 

Goggle-moggle was something both our mothers made for us. It must have been
fairly prevalent. My mother came >from TORUTINO, a village near ODESSA, while
my husband's mother came >from RAFALOVKA and he he was raised in ROKITNO. It
seemed to work!
Ala Gamulka


Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Dear Robbi,
My mother made a guggle muggle which I hated. It is a very common remedy.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

----- Original Message -----
From: <Rokoco1@aol.com>
To: Ukraine SIG <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2000 4:18 AM
Subject: [ukraine] Re: Missing Pieces of the Puzzle

My mother used to make me "google-moogle" when I had laryngitis. It
consisted of an egg yolk beaten with lots of sugar. Does this sound like
your remedy? Perhaps remedies familiar to some families shows that these
remedies were used in certain areas.

Sincerely,

Bobbi Cohen
San Diego, Ca Rokoco1@al.com


EHecht4085@...
 

Hi Bobbie, Florence et al,

My mother made a "gorggle-morggle" by using hot milk in which she placed a
spoonful of butter, so that you could see the fat of the butter riding on the
top. Sometimes, if we had eggs, after my dad sold his farm, she would put an
egg in. That depended on how bad the cough >from the "cold" was.

Gather that Russians used this type of remedy, because my mother came >from
Belaya-Tzerkov, in Kiev Gubernia.

Am not related to any of the previous submitters.

Eli Hecht
Syosset, NY


Raanan S Isseroff <raanan1@...>
 

BS"D

"google-moogle" is also good with a shot of Vodka and orange juice
concentrate beaten into the egg and other stuff. I believe the word
comes >from "Gog and MaGog" This is a traditional Jewish cure for sore
throats.
I saw a Chazon down one of these once (Made by his Russian grandmother)
before davening Rosh Hashanna.

Raanan Isseroff

On Tue, 21 Nov 2000 21:18:05 EST Rokoco1@aol.com writes:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Please visit the Ukraine SIG web site
<http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My mother used to make me "google-moogle" when I had laryngitis. It

consisted of an egg yolk beaten with lots of sugar. Does this sound
like
your remedy? Perhaps remedies familiar to some families shows that
these
remedies were used in certain areas.

Sincerely,

Bobbi Cohen
San Diego, Ca Rokoco1@al.com
MODERATOR's NOTE: Although this thread was "officially" & "soberly" closed a couple of days ago, Raanan's commentary seemed like THE definitive gogl'-mogol' recipe on which to say "L'chaim" - at last. It was irresistable. <VBG>