Mile High Resources: Researching Colorado Records with Ellen Kowitt


Ellen Beller
 

Sunday, January 26, 2020
9#0 AM to Noon
BMH-BJ Congregation

Beginning with a brief history and modern statistics, this lecture will provide local and online resources for anyone interested in documenting individuals in Colorado. Local repositories will be covered including materials at the CO State Archives, DU Beck Archives, History Colorado Hart Library, DPL Western History and Genealogy Department, Boulder Carnegie Library, National Archives Rocky Mountain Region (NARA), and the Bureau of Land Management Colorado Office. An inventory of CO records found online the global giant websites including Ancestry.comFamilySearchJewishGen, and MyHeritage will be reviewed as well as other collections with notable CO content such as the Industrial Removal Office, American Jewish Archives, and a variety of digitized CO newspapers. We will review current laws for access to vital records and the procedures of the CO Department of Public Health and Environment to obtain them, as well as a discussion regarding Colorado Session Laws circa 1861-1997. Previous indexing projects conducted by JGSCO volunteers and where to find them will be explored including Jewish gravestones in CO, JCRS patient applications, obituaries of the Intermountain Jewish News, synagogue memorial plaques, and mohel records.
For more information jgsco.org


Hilary Henkin
 

Greetings,
I am not in Colorado, so can't attend.  I do have a question about Colorado research, however.  If anyone is attending this, perhaps they can ask on my behalf?

I am interested in a 1906-1907 death, and births 1907-1912.

A family in my family tree immigrated from Russia in March 1906.  They arrived at NYC destined for Rochester, NY  They had one son, age 4.  They did have family already in Rochester.

When the father filled out his Declaration of Intention in 1922, he listed four other children, but not the original son.  All four later children were born in Denver, between 1907 and 1912.

I have a theory, based on general research, that the family went to Colorado because the son developed/had tuberculosis, but he died soon after.  (The child born next, in 1907, was named Alta.)

My understanding is that death records do not exist this early, and birth records are restricted to the person born, legal rep, etc.  I'd like to know if there are any other options for this information.

i can provide specific details privately

Regards,
Hilary Henkin

Researching:
Mogilev - BERLIN;  BELIISKI;  HENKIN - GENKIN;  MESCENIKOV;  POZ - POZE
Ekaterinoslav - KATZ; LAPIDUS;  LAVROTIN - LAVRUTIN - AVRUTIN;  PESACHINSKY; SHIMERNITSKY - SEMERNITSKY;  STEINHART
Roumania:  DONNENFIELD;  DOLLINGER;  RINCOVER - HARINCOVER;  WISENTHAL - VIESENTAUL
Harbin, China:  FELDMAN;  PENZNER;  SREBERK - SCHRIEBER;
Lublin, Poland:  KATZ;  JARMUSZ

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Sunday, January 26, 2020
9#0 AM to Noon
BMH-BJ Congregation

Beginning with a brief history and modern statistics, this lecture will provide local and online resources for anyone interested in documenting individuals in Colorado. Local repositories will be covered including materials at the CO State Archives, DU Beck Archives, History Colorado Hart Library, DPL Western History and Genealogy Department, Boulder Carnegie Library, National Archives Rocky Mountain Region (NARA), and the Bureau of Land Management Colorado Office. An inventory of CO records found online the global giant websites including Ancestry.comFamilySearchJewishGen, and MyHeritage will be reviewed as well as other collections with notable CO content such as the Industrial Removal Office, American Jewish Archives, and a variety of digitized CO newspapers. We will review current laws for access to vital records and the procedures of the CO Department of Public Health and Environment to obtain them, as well as a discussion regarding Colorado Session Laws circa 1861-1997. Previous indexing projects conducted by JGSCO volunteers and where to find them will be explored including Jewish gravestones in CO, JCRS patient applications, obituaries of the Intermountain Jewish News, synagogue memorial plaques, and mohel records.
For more information jgsco.org


Shelley Mitchell
 

It’s not uncommon for adult children to get their own naturalization, especially if they married an American. If my math is correct, he would have been 20 by then. It might have even been an arranged marriage.

Shelley Mitchell
NYC
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Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia.