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Birthplace?


Jonathan Jacobs
 

I have a family member that I am researching and she is from Solabarewka (supposedly Russia).  I have not been able to find this town with google.  Usually, with google, I can get general information on it but not this time.  That is my first step before going to shtel finder.
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Jonathan Jacobs
Computer Technician
Amateur Genealogist
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
skype - stingray761


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"I have a family member that I am researching and she is from Solabarewka (supposedly Russia).  I have not been able to find this town with google.  Usually, with google, I can get general information on it but not this time.  That is my first step before going to shte[t]l finder."

According to the JewishGen Gazetteer, there are a many choices for this town, including Sulborowice in Poland.  Jews were restricted to living in the Pale of Settlement, areas which became Russian after the partition of Poland. You can see the Pale and Partition on Google maps.  This includes areas of Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia and other areas.

If it were transliterated Russian, there would be no 'w' in the town name, as Russian uses the letter v, which does not exist in Polish; Polish uses the letter 'w' which has a v-sound.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


bernerfolk
 

Can you post a link to the record?  Perhaps a mis-reading of
Balabanovka
Lipovets
Kiev
Russian Empire

Sherri Venditti

>I have a family member that I am researching and she is from Solabarewka (supposedly Russia).


Alexander Sharon
 

This appears to be a place known as Solovyevka (Russian), listed also in JewishGen Gazetteer in Ukrainian as Soloviyivka (translates to English as Nightingale)

JGFF database lists two entries for this locality. Places by this name are located near large Jewish towns of Brusilov (Kiev region), Simferopol (Crimea), Vinnitsa and Voronovitsya (Podolia).